Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for

  • Author or Editor: Robert D. Palmer x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
James M. Kurdzo and Robert D. Palmer

Abstract

The current Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) radar network is approaching 20 years of age, leading researchers to begin exploring new opportunities for a next-generation network in the United States. With a vast list of requirements for a new weather radar network, research has provided various approaches to the design and fabrication of such a network. Additionally, new weather radar networks in other countries, as well as networks on smaller scales, must balance a large number of variables in order to operate in the most effective way possible. To offer network designers an objective analysis tool for such decisions, a coverage optimization technique, utilizing a genetic algorithm with a focus on low-level coverage, is presented. Optimization is achieved using a variety of variables and methods, including the use of climatology, population density, and attenuation due to average precipitation conditions. A method to account for terrain blockage in mountainous regions is also presented. Various combinations of multifrequency radar networks are explored, and results are presented in the form of a coverage-based cost–benefit analysis, with considerations for total network lifetime cost.

Full access
Brian R. Corner, Robert D. Palmer, and Miguel F. Larsen

Abstract

A new, inexpensive radiosonde transmitter and receiver system has been developed for measuring wind field inhomogeneities in the planetary boundary layer using multiple simultaneously launched balloons. The radiosondes use a narrowband-frequency-modulated carrier signal to transmit atmospheric pressure and temperature information to a surface receiver. The pressure and temperature data transmitted by the radiosondes allow their height above the surface to be ascertained. In addition, the radiosondes can be tracked with a photographic camera system to provide the azimuth and elevation angles of the radiosondes during their ascent, so that their three-dimensional horizontal position can be determined. By tracking the spatial separation of the radiosondes over time, horizontal gradients can be derived. The system hardware and results from preliminary tests are described.

Full access
Cesar M. Salazar Aquino, Boonleng Cheong, and Robert D. Palmer

Abstract

In this paper, a novel technique is proposed to mitigate the so-called blind range on radars that use pulse compression. It is well known that the blind range is caused by the strong leak through into the receiver during the transmission cycle. The proposed technique is called progressive pulse compression (PPC) and is based on partial decoding. PPC uses a portion of the uncontaminated received signal in conjunction with pulse compression to estimate the echoes from the incomplete signal. The technique does not require the use of a fill pulse or any hardware modifications. PPC can be divided into three steps. The first step is to discard all the received signals during the transmit cycle and apply a smooth taper for continuous transition from zero to one. The second step is to perform the pulse compression using matched filter. The combination of these two steps is equivalent to performing pulse compression using a progressively changing template to partially extract the uncontaminated received signal for compression. The third step is to compensate for the progressively changing template so that proper reflectivity values can be recovered. This technique has been tested on the PX-1000 and will be implemented on PX-10k in the near future. These two radars are designed and operated by the Advanced Radar Research Center at the University of Oklahoma and are both X-band software-defined solid-state systems. The results presented in this paper are collected using the PX-1000 radar.

Open access
David J. Bodine, Robert D. Palmer, and Guifu Zhang

Abstract

Statistical properties of tornado debris signatures (TDSs) are investigated using S- and C-band polarimetric radar data with comparisons to damage surveys and satellite imagery. Close proximity of the radars to the 10 May 2010 Moore–Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, tornado that was rated as a 4 on the enhanced Fujita scale (EF4) provides a large number of resolution volumes, and good temporal and spatial matching for dual-wavelength comparisons. These comparisons reveal that S-band TDSs exhibit a higher radar reflectivity factor (Z HH) and copolar cross-correlation coefficient (ρ hv) than do C-band TDSs. Higher S-band ρ hv may result from a smaller ratio of non-Rayleigh scatterers to total scatterers due to the smaller electrical sizes of debris and, consequently, reduced resonance effects. A negative Z DR signature is observed at 350 m AGL at both the S and C bands as the tornado passes over a vegetated area near a large body of water. Another interesting signature is a positive (negative) shift in propagation differential phase (ΦDP) at S band (C band), which could result from increased phase folding at C band. With increasing height above 350 m AGL, the S- and C-band Z HH decreases and ρ hv increases, indicating a decrease in debris size. To investigate relationships between polarimetric variables and tornado wind fields, range profiles of radial and tangential wind speeds are obtained using two radars. Velocity profiles reveal radial divergence within vortex core flow through 700 m AGL collocated with the TDS. Formation of a weak-echo hole and higher ρ hv in the vortex center aloft suggests debris centrifuging, outward motion of scatterers due to radial divergence (i.e., two-cell vortex flow), or both.

Full access
Boon Leng Cheong, Michael W. Hoffman, and Robert D. Palmer

Abstract

Numerical simulation can be used for optimizing radar imaging techniques because it allows the accuracy of various techniques to be studied. A simulation of atmospheric conditions by using scatterers in a 3D volume was proposed by Holdsworth and Reid. For this method, the computational burden increases as the square of the number of scatterers. Hence, the simulation can become time consuming if a large number of scatterers is required in order to simulate atmospheric conditions more realistically. A method based on table lookup and linear interpolation is proposed to replace the existing turbulent wind field generation of Holdsworth and Reid. Moreover, this method has the flexibility of incorporating other turbulent wind field data, either measured or modeled. Pseudocode of the simulation using this method is included, and a comparison of the computational burden for each of the techniques is presented.

Full access
Nicholas A. Gasperoni, Ming Xue, Robert D. Palmer, and Jidong Gao

Abstract

The Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) system is enhanced to include the analysis of radar-derived refractivity measurements. These refractivity data are most sensitive to atmospheric moisture content and provide high-resolution information on near-surface moisture that is important to convective initiation (CI) and precipitation forecasting. Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are performed using simulated refractivity data. The impacts of refractivity on CI and subsequent forecasts are investigated in the presence of varying observation error, radar location, data coverage, and different uncertainties in the background field. Cycled refractivity assimilation and forecasts are performed and the results compared to the truth. In addition to the perfect model experiments, imperfect model experiments are performed where the forecasts use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model instead of the ARPS. A simulation for the 19 May 2010 central plain convection case is used for the OSSEs. It involves a large storm system, large convective available potential energy, and little convective inhibition, allowing for CI along a warm front in northern Oklahoma and ahead of a dryline later to the southwest. Emphasis is placed on the quality of moisture analyses and the subsequent forecasts of CI. Results show the ability of refractivity assimilation to correct low-level moisture errors, leading to improved CI forecasts. Equitable threat scores for reflectivity are generally higher when refractivity data are assimilated. Tests show small sensitivity to increased observational error or ground clutter coverage, and greater sensitivity to the limited data coverage of a single radar.

Full access
Casey B. Griffin, David J. Bodine, and Robert D. Palmer

Abstract

Tornadoes are capable of lofting large pieces of debris that present irregular shapes, near-random orientations, and a wide range of dielectric constants to polarimetric radars. The unique polarimetric signature associated with lofted debris is called the tornadic debris signature (TDS). While ties between TDS characteristics and tornado- and storm-scale kinematic processes have been speculated upon or investigated using photogrammetry and single-Doppler analyses, little work has been done to document the three-dimensional wind field associated with the TDS.

Data collected by the Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (KTLX), and Norman, Oklahoma (KOUN), WSR-88D S-band radars as well as the University of Oklahoma’s (OU) Advanced Radar Research Center’s Polarimetric Radar for Innovations in Meteorology and Engineering (OU-PRIME) C-band radar are used to construct single- and dual-Doppler analyses of a tornadic supercell that produced an EF4 tornado near the towns of Moore and Choctaw, Oklahoma, on 10 May 2010. This study documents the spatial distribution of polarimetric radar variables and how each variable relates to kinematic fields such as vertical velocity and vertical vorticity. Special consideration is given to polarimetric signatures associated with subvortices within the tornado. An observation of negative differential reflectivity () at the periphery of tornado subvortices is presented and discussed. Finally, dual-Doppler wind retrievals are compared to single-Doppler axisymmetric wind fields to illustrate the merits of each method.

Full access
Tian-You Yu, Ricardo Reinoso Rondinel, and Robert D. Palmer

Abstract

Radar Doppler spectra that deviate from a Gaussian shape were observed from a tornadic supercell on 10 May 2003, exhibiting features such as a dual peak, flat top, and wide skirt in the nontornadic region. Motivated by these observations, a spectral model of a mixture of two Gaussian components, each defined by its three spectral moments, is introduced to characterize different degrees of deviation from Gaussian shape. In the standard autocovariance method, a Gaussian spectrum is assumed and biases in velocity and spectrum width estimates may result if this assumption is violated. The impact of non-Gaussian weather spectra on these biases is formulated and quantified in theory and, consequently, verified using four experiments of numerical simulations.

Those non-Gaussian spectra from the south region of the supercell are further examined and a nonlinear fitting algorithm is proposed to estimate the six spectral moments and compare to those obtained from the autocovariance method. It is shown that the dual-Gaussian model can better represent observed spectra for those cases. The authors’ analysis suggests that vertical shear may be responsible for the flat-top or the dual-peak spectra in the lower elevation of 0.5° and their transition to the single-peak and wide-skirt spectra in the next elevation scan of 1.5°.

Full access
C. D. Roberts, D. Calvert, N. Dunstone, L. Hermanson, M. D. Palmer, and D. Smith

Abstract

Observations and eddy-permitting ocean model simulations are used to evaluate the drivers of sea level variability associated with 15 modes of climate variability covering the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Southern Oceans. Sea level signals are decomposed into barotropic, steric, and inverted barometer contributions. Forcings are decomposed into surface winds, buoyancy fluxes, and Ekman pumping. Seasonal-to-interannual sea level variability in the low latitudes is governed almost entirely by the thermosteric response to wind forcing associated with tropical modes of climate variability. In the extratropics, changes to dynamic sea level associated with atmospheric modes of variability include a substantial barotropic response to wind forcing, particularly over the continental shelf seas. However, wind-driven steric changes are also important in some locations. On interannual time scales, wind-forced steric changes dominate, although heat and freshwater fluxes are important in the northwest Atlantic, where low-frequency sea level variations are associated with changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Using the version 3 of the Met Office Decadal Prediction System (DePreSys3), the predictability of large-scale dynamic sea level anomalies on seasonal-to-interannual time scales is evaluated. For the first year of the hindcast simulations, DePreSys3 exhibits skill exceeding persistence over large regions of the Pacific, Atlantic, and Indian Oceans. Skill is particularly high in the tropical Indo-Pacific because of the accurate initialization and propagation of thermocline depth anomalies associated with baroclinic adjustments to remote wind forcing. Skill in the extratropics is hindered by the limited predictability of wind anomalies associated with modes of atmospheric variability that dominate local and/or barotropic responses.

Full access
James M. Kurdzo, David J. Bodine, Boon Leng Cheong, and Robert D. Palmer

Abstract

On 20 May 2013, the cities of Newcastle, Oklahoma City, and Moore, Oklahoma, were impacted by a long-track violent tornado that was rated as an EF5 on the enhanced Fujita scale by the National Weather Service. Despite a relatively sustained long track, damage surveys revealed a number of small-scale damage indicators that hinted at storm-scale processes that occurred over short time periods. The University of Oklahoma (OU) Advanced Radar Research Center’s PX-1000 transportable, polarimetric, X-band weather radar was operating in a single-elevation PPI scanning strategy at the OU Westheimer airport throughout the duration of the tornado, collecting high spatial and temporal resolution polarimetric data every 20 s at ranges as close as 10 km and heights below 500 m AGL. This dataset contains the only known polarimetric radar observations of the Moore tornado at such high temporal resolution, providing the opportunity to analyze and study finescale phenomena occurring on rapid time scales. Analysis is presented of a series of debris ejections and rear-flank gust front surges that both preceded and followed a loop of the tornado as it weakened over the Moore Medical Center before rapidly accelerating and restrengthening to the east. The gust front structure, debris characteristics, and differential reflectivity arc breakdown are explored as evidence for a “failed occlusion” hypothesis. Observations are supported by rigorous hand analysis of critical storm attributes, including tornado track relative to the damage survey, sudden track shifts, and a directional debris ejection analysis. A conceptual description and illustration of the suspected failed occlusion process is provided, and its implications are discussed.

Full access