Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Roberto Bilbao x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Dragana Bojovic
,
Roberto Bilbao
,
Leandro B. Díaz
,
Markus Donat
,
Pablo Ortega
,
Yohan Ruprich-Robert
,
Balakrishnan Solaraju-Murali
,
Marta Terrado
,
Deborah Verfaillie
, and
Francisco Doblas-Reyes
Free access
Leon Hermanson
,
Doug Smith
,
Melissa Seabrook
,
Roberto Bilbao
,
Francisco Doblas-Reyes
,
Etienne Tourigny
,
Vladimir Lapin
,
Viatcheslav V. Kharin
,
William J. Merryfield
,
Reinel Sospedra-Alfonso
,
Panos Athanasiadis
,
Dario Nicoli
,
Silvio Gualdi
,
Nick Dunstone
,
Rosie Eade
,
Adam Scaife
,
Mark Collier
,
Terence O’Kane
,
Vassili Kitsios
,
Paul Sandery
,
Klaus Pankatz
,
Barbara Früh
,
Holger Pohlmann
,
Wolfgang Müller
,
Takahito Kataoka
,
Hiroaki Tatebe
,
Masayoshi Ishii
,
Yukiko Imada
,
Tim Kruschke
,
Torben Koenigk
,
Mehdi Pasha Karami
,
Shuting Yang
,
Tian Tian
,
Liping Zhang
,
Tom Delworth
,
Xiaosong Yang
,
Fanrong Zeng
,
Yiguo Wang
,
François Counillon
,
Noel Keenlyside
,
Ingo Bethke
,
Judith Lean
,
Jürg Luterbacher
,
Rupa Kumar Kolli
, and
Arun Kumar

Abstract

As climate change accelerates, societies and climate-sensitive socioeconomic sectors cannot continue to rely on the past as a guide to possible future climate hazards. Operational decadal predictions offer the potential to inform current adaptation and increase resilience by filling the important gap between seasonal forecasts and climate projections. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has recognized this and in 2017 established the WMO Lead Centre for Annual to Decadal Climate Predictions (shortened to “Lead Centre” below), which annually provides a large multimodel ensemble of predictions covering the next 5 years. This international collaboration produces a prediction that is more skillful and useful than any single center can achieve. One of the main outputs of the Lead Centre is the Global Annual to Decadal Climate Update (GADCU), a consensus forecast based on these predictions. This update includes maps showing key variables, discussion on forecast skill, and predictions of climate indices such as the global mean near-surface temperature and Atlantic multidecadal variability. it also estimates the probability of the global mean temperature exceeding 1.5°C above preindustrial levels for at least 1 year in the next 5 years, which helps policy-makers understand how closely the world is approaching this goal of the Paris Agreement. This paper, written by the authors of the GADCU, introduces the GADCU, presents its key outputs, and briefly discusses its role in providing vital climate information for society now and in the future.

Full access
William J. Merryfield
,
Johanna Baehr
,
Lauriane Batté
,
Emily J. Becker
,
Amy H. Butler
,
Caio A. S. Coelho
,
Gokhan Danabasoglu
,
Paul A. Dirmeyer
,
Francisco J. Doblas-Reyes
,
Daniela I. V. Domeisen
,
Laura Ferranti
,
Tatiana Ilynia
,
Arun Kumar
,
Wolfgang A. Müller
,
Michel Rixen
,
Andrew W. Robertson
,
Doug M. Smith
,
Yuhei Takaya
,
Matthias Tuma
,
Frederic Vitart
,
Christopher J. White
,
Mariano S. Alvarez
,
Constantin Ardilouze
,
Hannah Attard
,
Cory Baggett
,
Magdalena A. Balmaseda
,
Asmerom F. Beraki
,
Partha S. Bhattacharjee
,
Roberto Bilbao
,
Felipe M. de Andrade
,
Michael J. DeFlorio
,
Leandro B. Díaz
,
Muhammad Azhar Ehsan
,
Georgios Fragkoulidis
,
Sam Grainger
,
Benjamin W. Green
,
Momme C. Hell
,
Johnna M. Infanti
,
Katharina Isensee
,
Takahito Kataoka
,
Ben P. Kirtman
,
Nicholas P. Klingaman
,
June-Yi Lee
,
Kirsten Mayer
,
Roseanna McKay
,
Jennifer V. Mecking
,
Douglas E. Miller
,
Nele Neddermann
,
Ching Ho Justin Ng
,
Albert Ossó
,
Klaus Pankatz
,
Simon Peatman
,
Kathy Pegion
,
Judith Perlwitz
,
G. Cristina Recalde-Coronel
,
Annika Reintges
,
Christoph Renkl
,
Balakrishnan Solaraju-Murali
,
Aaron Spring
,
Cristiana Stan
,
Y. Qiang Sun
,
Carly R. Tozer
,
Nicolas Vigaud
,
Steven Woolnough
, and
Stephen Yeager
Full access
William J. Merryfield
,
Johanna Baehr
,
Lauriane Batté
,
Emily J. Becker
,
Amy H. Butler
,
Caio A. S. Coelho
,
Gokhan Danabasoglu
,
Paul A. Dirmeyer
,
Francisco J. Doblas-Reyes
,
Daniela I. V. Domeisen
,
Laura Ferranti
,
Tatiana Ilynia
,
Arun Kumar
,
Wolfgang A. Müller
,
Michel Rixen
,
Andrew W. Robertson
,
Doug M. Smith
,
Yuhei Takaya
,
Matthias Tuma
,
Frederic Vitart
,
Christopher J. White
,
Mariano S. Alvarez
,
Constantin Ardilouze
,
Hannah Attard
,
Cory Baggett
,
Magdalena A. Balmaseda
,
Asmerom F. Beraki
,
Partha S. Bhattacharjee
,
Roberto Bilbao
,
Felipe M. de Andrade
,
Michael J. DeFlorio
,
Leandro B. Díaz
,
Muhammad Azhar Ehsan
,
Georgios Fragkoulidis
,
Sam Grainger
,
Benjamin W. Green
,
Momme C. Hell
,
Johnna M. Infanti
,
Katharina Isensee
,
Takahito Kataoka
,
Ben P. Kirtman
,
Nicholas P. Klingaman
,
June-Yi Lee
,
Kirsten Mayer
,
Roseanna McKay
,
Jennifer V. Mecking
,
Douglas E. Miller
,
Nele Neddermann
,
Ching Ho Justin Ng
,
Albert Ossó
,
Klaus Pankatz
,
Simon Peatman
,
Kathy Pegion
,
Judith Perlwitz
,
G. Cristina Recalde-Coronel
,
Annika Reintges
,
Christoph Renkl
,
Balakrishnan Solaraju-Murali
,
Aaron Spring
,
Cristiana Stan
,
Y. Qiang Sun
,
Carly R. Tozer
,
Nicolas Vigaud
,
Steven Woolnough
, and
Stephen Yeager

Abstract

Weather and climate variations on subseasonal to decadal time scales can have enormous social, economic, and environmental impacts, making skillful predictions on these time scales a valuable tool for decision-makers. As such, there is a growing interest in the scientific, operational, and applications communities in developing forecasts to improve our foreknowledge of extreme events. On subseasonal to seasonal (S2S) time scales, these include high-impact meteorological events such as tropical cyclones, extratropical storms, floods, droughts, and heat and cold waves. On seasonal to decadal (S2D) time scales, while the focus broadly remains similar (e.g., on precipitation, surface and upper-ocean temperatures, and their effects on the probabilities of high-impact meteorological events), understanding the roles of internal variability and externally forced variability such as anthropogenic warming in forecasts also becomes important. The S2S and S2D communities share common scientific and technical challenges. These include forecast initialization and ensemble generation; initialization shock and drift; understanding the onset of model systematic errors; bias correction, calibration, and forecast quality assessment; model resolution; atmosphere–ocean coupling; sources and expectations for predictability; and linking research, operational forecasting, and end-user needs. In September 2018 a coordinated pair of international conferences, framed by the above challenges, was organized jointly by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) and the World Weather Research Programme (WWRP). These conferences surveyed the state of S2S and S2D prediction, ongoing research, and future needs, providing an ideal basis for synthesizing current and emerging developments in these areas that promise to enhance future operational services. This article provides such a synthesis.

Free access