Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Rudolf F. Pueschel x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Rudolf F. Pueschel
and
Gerhard Langer

Abstract

Full access
Yaacov Mamane
and
Rudolf F. Pueschel

Abstract

On 6 June 1978, the Four Corners coal-fired power plant plume near Farmington, New Mexico, was sampled with an instrumented twin-engine Aero-commander 680E, up to 90 km downwind from the source. Measurements consisted of aerosol size distribution, condensation nuclei, various gases, individual particle chemistry using electron microscopy techniques and meteorological parameters.

A substantial formation of condensation nuclei took place downwind of the plant at a rate of 1.3 × 1016 s−1 in the first 0.3 h, 3.3 × 1017 s−1 up to 2.5 h, and 8 × 1017 s−1 in the 2.5–12.5 h plume travel time. The corresponding conversion rates were 0.15, 0.5 and 0.3% h−1, respectively. The conversion rate due to oxidation of SO2 on surfaces of fly ash particles was negligible. Dry removal of particles was very high and reached an estimated maximum of 36% during the first 2.5 h probably due to partial impingements of the plume to the ground.

Analysis of individual particles collected on nuclepore filters using a scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray energy dispersive analyzer, as well as particles collected on electron microscope screens for the detection of sulfate, show definitely that particles <0.5 μm are mostly sulfates, with 10–15% fly ash. In the larger size range most particles were identified as fly ash.

Full access
Rudolf F. Pueschel
and
Kenneth E. Noll

Abstract

The visual quality of the atmosphere in terms of the meteorological range has become a frequently used working standard in aviation and air pollution. Calculations of the meteorological range based on measured size frequency distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere are compared with visibility observations and discussed with regard to existing weather conditions. The results show the existence of strong inhomogeneities in the aerosol content of air and indicate the necessity for objective means in order to quantitatively evaluate the visual quality of the atmosphere. It follows from the calculations that changes in refractive index and wavelength within their limiting values have little influence on the total extinction of any size distribution.

Full access
Rudolf F. Pueschel
,
Charles J. Garcia
, and
Richard T. Hansen

Abstract

Atmospheric water vapor attenuates normal incidence solar radiation received on Mauna Loa, Hawaii, by up to 10%. During periods of active fountaining, aerosols from Kilauea Volcano at times obscure global trends in atmospheric turbidity. Corollary measurements such as precipitable water and the aureole are necessary in order to evaluate the effects upon solar radiation of global trends in atmospheric turbidity.

Full access