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Gary E. Moore, Christopher Daly, Mei-Kao Liu, and Shi-Jian Huang

Abstract

A dry three-dimensional mesoscale model was used to study the diurnal cycle of mountain-valley winds in the southern San Joaquin Valley during a summer day. A scheme for interpolating potential temperature was developed to provide hourly temperature fields to initialize and force the dynamically predicted wind fields. A simplified modeling approach was used to produce steady state solutions that are dynamically consistent with the momentum equation and supplied temperature fields. Model performance was evaluated by comparing observed and predicted surface winds. Some features of the wind field flow aloft were qualitatively examined with regard to their importance in air quality studies.

The morning drainage-upslope transition and the evening reversal of upslope flow were realistically simulated throughout most of the valley. The variation of wind speeds throughout the valley and over the course of the day were simulated with an average bias of 9% of the average wind. Wind directions were simulated with an overall average bias of 5° and midday hourly correlation coefficients of typically r = 0.8. Model performance was below average during the morning and evening transition periods, when thermal forcing is at a minimum and valley winds are light and variable. At midday, the model produces strong upward vertical motions near the ridge crests and divergence-driven subsidences at the foot of the mountains typical of observations made in mountain-valley systems. During the morning, modeled drainage flow down the mountains results in a convergence zone in the southern and narrowest part of the valley, resulting in rising motions; down-valley flow, sometimes observed in mountain-valley systems, also occurs. The model is best suited for applications in mountain-valley regions for which wind observations are sparse and do not adequately reflect thermally driven circulation.

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Lei Yang, Dongxiao Wang, Jian Huang, Xin Wang, Lili Zeng, Rui Shi, Yunkai He, Qiang Xie, Shengan Wang, Rongyu Chen, Jinnan Yuan, Qiang Wang, Ju Chen, Tingting Zu, Jian Li, Dandan Sui, and Shiqiu Peng

Abstract

Air–sea interaction in the South China Sea (SCS) has direct impacts on the weather and climate of its surrounding areas at various spatiotemporal scales. In situ observation plays a vital role in exploring the dynamic characteristics of the regional circulation and air–sea interaction. Remote sensing and regional modeling are expected to provide high-resolution data for studies of air–sea coupling; however, careful validation and calibration using in situ observations is necessary to ensure the quality of these data. Through a decade of effort, a marine observation network in the SCS has begun to be established, yielding a regional observatory for the air–sea synoptic system.

Earlier observations in the SCS were scarce and narrowly focused. Since 2004, an annual series of scientific open cruises during late summer in the SCS has been organized by the South China Sea Institute of Oceanology (SCSIO), carefully designed based on the dynamic characteristics of the oceanic circulation and air–sea interaction in the SCS region. Since 2006, the cruise carried a radiometer and radiosondes on board, marking a new era of marine meteorological observation in the SCS. Fixed stations have been established for long-term and sustained records. Observations obtained through the network have been used to study regional ocean circulation and processes in the marine atmospheric boundary layer. In the future, a great number of multi-institutional, collaborative scientific cruises and observations at fixed stations will be carried out to establish a mesoscale hydrological and marine meteorological observation network in the SCS.

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Lili Zeng, Gengxin Chen, Ke Huang, Ju Chen, Yunkai He, Fenghua Zhou, Yikai Yang, Zhanlin Liang, Qihua Peng, Rui Shi, Tilak Priyadarshana Gamage, Rongyu Chen, Jian Li, Zhenqiu Zhang, Zewen Wu, Linghui Yu, and Dongxiao Wang

Abstract

As an important part of the Indo-Pacific warm pool, the Indian Ocean has great significance for research on the Asian monsoon system and global climate change. From the 1960s onward, several international and regional programs have led to important new insights into the Indian Ocean. The eastern Tropical Indian Ocean Observation Network (TIOON) was established in 2010. The TIOON consists of two parts: large-scope observations and moored measurements. Large-scope observations are performed by the eastern Tropical Indian Ocean Comprehensive Experiment Cruise (TIO-CEC). Moored measurements are executed by the TIOON mooring array and the hydrological meteorological buoy. By 2019, 10 successful TIO-CEC voyages had been accomplished, making this mission the most comprehensive scientific investigation in China. The TIO-CEC voyages have collected temperature/salinity profiles, GPS radiosonde profiles, and other observations in the Indian Ocean. To supplement the existing buoy array in the Indian Ocean, an enhanced TIOON mooring array consisting of eight subthermocline acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) moorings, was established since 2013. The TIOON mooring equipped with both upward-looking and downward-looking WHLS75K ADCP provide valuable current monitoring information to depth of 1,000 m in the Indian Ocean. To improve air–sea interaction monitoring, two real-time hydrological–meteorological buoys were deployed in 2019 and 2020 in the equatorial Indian Ocean. A better understanding of the Indian Ocean requires continuous and long-term observations. The TIOON program and other aspiring field investigation programs will be promoted in the future.

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