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STANLEY L. ROSENTHAL

Abstract

The accuracy of a numerical technique devised for the purpose of obtaining approximate solutions to an initial value problem defined by linearized equations for quasi-geostrophic flow is tested in certain simple cases for which it is possible to obtain closed solutions. The numerical technique is found to be extremely accurate.

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STANLEY L. ROSENTHAL

Abstract

Disturbances with scales of a few thousand kilometers are commonly observed in the troposphere over the subtropical oceans. Synoptic experience seems to indicate that many of these large-scale disturbances are driven by latent heat released in organized convection. To explore this possibility, a series of numerical experiments were conducted with a simple, two-layer, quasi-geostrophic model. The convective heating function was treated in the same manner as that employed by various investigators in recent studies of hurricane dynamics. In this formulation, convection is controlled by frictional convergence in the Ekman layer. These numerical experiments show that this heating mechanism, within the framework of the simple dynamical model employed, can produce significant intensification of large-scale disturbances.

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Stanley L. Rosenthal

Abstract

Frequency distributions of aperiodic diurnal ranges of temperatures at 9 of the North Atlantic Ocean Vessel Stations are examined. It is found that the means, disperions, and asymmetries of these distributions are largest in winter and smallest in summer. It is also found that the aperiodic diurnal range exceeds the periodic diurnal range on virtually all winter days and on the great majority of summer days.

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STANLEY L. ROSENTHAL

Abstract

The results of a series of numerical experiments which were intended to simulate the warming and developing stages of hurricane formation are discussed. In the experiments, an initially weak cyclone develops into an intense vortex. However, the deepening proceeds too rapidly and meridional circulations which are too intense develop. The inclusion of ground friction and vertical mixing leads to solutions which are even less acceptable. Lateral mixing slows the development but only provides a temporary delay in the generation of an unacceptably intense meridional circulation.

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Stanley L. Rosenthal

Abstract

Power spectra, covering a range of periods of from 1.2 to 30 days, of the zonal- and meridional-wind components at the 5000- and 40,000-ft levels at seven low latitude stations are presented. A brief discussion of the spectra is given.

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STANLEY L. ROSENTHAL

Abstract

Simulations of the natural (unmodified) evolution of tropical cyclones with a circularly symmetric model suggest that seeding of hurricanes with silver iodide at radii greater than that of the surface wind maximum might be more effective in decreasing the surface wind maximum than seedings at or within the wind maximum. Seeding simulations with the model strongly suggest that the model storm responds in the sense anticipated. On the other hand, simulated seedings at radii less than that of the surface wind maximum produce temporary increases in the strength of the maximum. However, termination of the seeding is followed by a rapid recovery of the modified storm to a state close to that of the control.

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Stanley L. Rosenthal

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

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Stanley L. Rosenthal

Abstract

A set of regression equations, which relate the 05, 25, 50, 75, and 95 per cent points of the surface-air temperature frequenry distributions over the North Atlantic Ocean to mean temperatures interpolated from charts contained in the U. S. Navy Marine Climatic Atlas of the World, Vol. I, North Atlantic Ocean, is obtained. With these equations and the previously mentioned climatic atlas, one can estimate the surface-air temperature frequency distribution at any given point over the North Atlantic Ocean. Tests conducted with independent data indicate that the equations give accurate results.

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Stanley L. Rosenthal

Abstract

If the perturbation of the zonal wind component and the Coriolis term which arises in the zonal equation of motion as a result of vertical motions are neglected, the linearized vorticity equation and the continuity equation (when written in pressure coordinates) become a complete set for the meridional wind and vertical motion perturbations. This set is solved for a class of easterly waves which reach their maximum intensity at the equator and dampen poleward.

The theoretical streamlines and the theoretical field of divergence both agree quite well with their empirical counterparts. On the other hand, the theoretical isotachs are somewhat distorted and the theoretical phase speed is a bit low.

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