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Stuart D. Smith

Abstract

An offshore stable platform has been instrumented with wind turbulence, temperature and wave height sensors. Data from this platform have been analyzed by the eddy correlation method to obtain wind stress and heat flux at wind speeds from 6 to 22 m s−1 in a deep-water wave regime, significantly extending the range of available measurements. The sea surface drag coefficient increases gradually with increasing wind speed.

Sensible heat fluxes have been observed over a much wider range than previously available. Heat flux coefficients are higher in unstable than stable conditions, but are not seen to increase with increasing wind speed.

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Lutz Hasse and Stuart D. Smith

Abstract

Parameterization of turbulent wind stress and sensible and latent heat fluxes is reviewed in the context of climate studies and model calculations, and specific formulas based on local measurements are recommended. Wind speed is of key importance, and in applying experimental results, the differences between local and modeled winds must be considered in terms of their method of observation or calculation. Climatological wind data based on Beaufort wind force reports require correction for historical trends. Integrated long-term net turbulent and radiative heat fluxes at the sea surface, calculated from archived data, are consistent with meridional heat transport through oceanographic sections; this lends support to the methods used.

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Stuart D. Smith, Kristina B. Katsaros, Wiebe A. Oost, and Patrice G. Mestayer

Humidity Exchange over the Sea (HEXOS) is an international program for the study of evaporation and spray droplet flux from sea to air. The program includes measurements in the field, simulation studies in wind tunnels, interpretive studies such as flow distortion modeling, boundary-layer modeling and development of parameterization for use in synoptic, and climatic models of the atmosphere and ocean.

The HEXOS Main Experiment (HEXMAX) was carried out in October and November of 1986 at the Dutch offshore research platform Meetpost Noordwijk (MPN) and from ship, aircraft, and shore stations in the vicinity. Evaporation, wind stress, and heat flux were determined at all stations using combinations of eddy correlation, dissipation, and profile methods. Concurrent measurements of spray and aerosol distributions and other relevant parameters, and the regular occurence of favorable winds and weather make the HEXMAX dataset unique in its completeness and in the range of conditions covered. Some preliminary results are reported.

The series of the French Couche Limite Unidimensionelle Stationnaire d'Embruns (CLUSE) experiments is designed to study in a simulation tunnel the surface flux of droplets generated by bursting bubbles and the interaction of these droplets with the turbulent fields of humidity, temperature, and velocity in the boundary layer. Grand CLUSE, in the spring of 1988, simulated aerosol generation and interactions of the aerosols with turbulent fields of temperature, humidity and wind. A series of four smaller Petit CLUSE experiments addressed specific techniques and the simulation of specific processes.

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Mark A. Donelan, Fred W. Dobson, Stuart D. Smith, and Robert J. Anderson

Abstract

No abstract available

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Kristina B. Katsaros, Stuart D. Smith, and Wiebe A. Oost

HEXOS is an international program for the study of evaporation and spray-droplet flux from sea to air. The program includes measurements in the field at moderate-to-high wind speeds, wind-tunnel studies, instrument development, boundary-layer modeling, and subsequent development of parameterization for use in synoptic and climatic models of the atmosphere and the ocean. Present accomplishments of the program are 1) a wind-tunnel study of the flow distortion around the Dutch research platform, Meetpost Noordwijk, 2) a pilot experiment at this platform in November 1984, and 3) an investigation of processes near the air-sea interface in a wind-wave simulation tunnel. The main field experiment, taking place in the autumn of 1986 at and around the Noordwijk platform, includes measurements of the fluxes of water vapor, spray droplets, sensible heat, and momentum, as well as the structure of the planetary boundary layer and the state of the sea. This multidisciplinary effort involves direct measurements from the platform, a mast, a ship, a tethered balloon, moorings, and an aircraft, plus measurements obtained remotely by laser scintillometer, lidar, and radar.

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Mark A. Donelan, Fred W. Dobson, Stuart D. Smith, and Robert J. Anderson

Abstract

The aerodynamic roughness of the sea surface, z 0, is investigated using data from Lake Ontario, from the North Sea near the Dutch coast, and from an exposed site in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Nova Scotia. Scaling z 0 by rms wave height gives consistent results for all three datasets, except where wave heights in the Atlantic Ocean are dominated by swell. The normalized roughness depends strongly on wave age: younger waves (traveling slower than the wind) are rougher than mature waves. Alternatively, the roughness may be normalized using the friction velocity, u *, of the wind stress. Again, young waves are rougher than mature waves. This contradicts some recent deductions in the literature, but the contradiction arises from attempts to describe z 0 in laboratory tanks and in the field with a single simple parameterization. Here, it is demonstrated that laboratory waves are inappropriate for direct comparison with field data, being much smoother than their field equivalents. In the open ocean there is usually a mixture of swell and wind-driven sea, and more work is needed before the scaling of surface roughness in these complex conditions can be understood.

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Wiebe A. Oost, Christopher W. Fairall, James B. Edson, Stuart D. Smith, Robert J. Anderson, John A.B. Wills, Kristina B. Katsaros, and Janice DeCosmo

Abstract

Several methods are examined for correction of turbulence and eddy fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer, two of them based on a potential-flow approach initiated by Wyngaard. If the distorting object is cylindrical or if the distance to the sensor is much greater than the size of the body, the undisturbed wind stress can be calculated solely from measurements made by the sensor itself; no auxiliary measurements or lengthy model calculations are needed. A more general potential-flow correction has been developed in which distorting objects of complex shape are represented as a number of ellipsoidal elements.

These models are applied to data from three turbulence anemometers with differing amounts of flow distortion, operated simultaneously in the Humidity Exchange over the Sea (HEXOS) Main Experiment. The results are compared with wind-stress estimates by the inertial-dissipation technique; these are much less sensitive to local flow distortion and are consistent with the corrected eddy correlation results. From these comparisons it is concluded that the commonly used “tilt correction” is not sufficient to correct eddy wind stress for distortion by nearby objects, such as probe supports and neighboring sensors.

Neither potential-flow method is applicable to distortion by larger bodies of a scale comparable to the measuring height, such as the superstructure of the Meetpost Noordwijk (MPN) platform used in HEXOS. Flow distortion has been measured around a model of MPN in a wind tunnel study. The results were used to correct mean winds, but simulation of distortion effects on turbulence levels and wind stress turned out not to be feasible.

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Ronald B. Smith, Alison D. Nugent, Christopher G. Kruse, David C. Fritts, James D. Doyle, Steven D. Eckermann, Michael J. Taylor, Andreas Dörnbrack, M. Uddstrom, William Cooper, Pavel Romashkin, Jorgen Jensen, and Stuart Beaton

Abstract

During the Deep Propagating Gravity Wave Experiment (DEEPWAVE) project in June and July 2014, the Gulfstream V research aircraft flew 97 legs over the Southern Alps of New Zealand and 150 legs over the Tasman Sea and Southern Ocean, mostly in the low stratosphere at 12.1-km altitude. Improved instrument calibration, redundant sensors, longer flight legs, energy flux estimation, and scale analysis revealed several new gravity wave properties. Over the sea, flight-level wave fluxes mostly fell below the detection threshold. Over terrain, disturbances had characteristic mountain wave attributes of positive vertical energy flux (EFz), negative zonal momentum flux, and upwind horizontal energy flux. In some cases, the fluxes changed rapidly within an 8-h flight, even though environmental conditions were nearly unchanged. The largest observed zonal momentum and vertical energy fluxes were MFx = −550 mPa and EFz = 22 W m−2, respectively.

A wide variety of disturbance scales were found at flight level over New Zealand. The vertical wind variance at flight level was dominated by short “fluxless” waves with wavelengths in the 6–15-km range. Even shorter scales, down to 500 m, were found in wave breaking regions. The wavelength of the flux-carrying mountain waves was much longer—mostly between 60 and 150 km. In the strong cases, however, with EFz > 4 W m−2, the dominant flux wavelength decreased (i.e., “downshifted”) to an intermediate wavelength between 20 and 60 km. A potential explanation for the rapid flux changes and the scale “downshifting” is that low-level flow can shift between “terrain following” and “envelope following” associated with trapped air in steep New Zealand valleys.

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Britton B. Stephens, Matthew C. Long, Ralph F. Keeling, Eric A. Kort, Colm Sweeney, Eric C. Apel, Elliot L. Atlas, Stuart Beaton, Jonathan D. Bent, Nicola J. Blake, James F. Bresch, Joanna Casey, Bruce C. Daube, Minghui Diao, Ernesto Diaz, Heidi Dierssen, Valeria Donets, Bo-Cai Gao, Michelle Gierach, Robert Green, Justin Haag, Matthew Hayman, Alan J. Hills, Martín S. Hoecker-Martínez, Shawn B. Honomichl, Rebecca S. Hornbrook, Jorgen B. Jensen, Rong-Rong Li, Ian McCubbin, Kathryn McKain, Eric J. Morgan, Scott Nolte, Jordan G. Powers, Bryan Rainwater, Kaylan Randolph, Mike Reeves, Sue M. Schauffler, Katherine Smith, Mackenzie Smith, Jeff Stith, Gregory Stossmeister, Darin W. Toohey, and Andrew S. Watt

Abstract

The Southern Ocean plays a critical role in the global climate system by mediating atmosphere–ocean partitioning of heat and carbon dioxide. However, Earth system models are demonstrably deficient in the Southern Ocean, leading to large uncertainties in future air–sea CO2 flux projections under climate warming and incomplete interpretations of natural variability on interannual to geologic time scales. Here, we describe a recent aircraft observational campaign, the O2/N2 Ratio and CO2 Airborne Southern Ocean (ORCAS) study, which collected measurements over the Southern Ocean during January and February 2016. The primary research objective of the ORCAS campaign was to improve observational constraints on the seasonal exchange of atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen with the Southern Ocean. The campaign also included measurements of anthropogenic and marine biogenic reactive gases; high-resolution, hyperspectral ocean color imaging of the ocean surface; and microphysical data relevant for understanding and modeling cloud processes. In each of these components of the ORCAS project, the campaign has significantly expanded the amount of observational data available for this remote region. Ongoing research based on these observations will contribute to advancing our understanding of this climatically important system across a range of topics including carbon cycling, atmospheric chemistry and transport, and cloud physics. This article presents an overview of the scientific and methodological aspects of the ORCAS project and highlights early findings.

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