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Stuart G Bigler
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Myron G. H. Ligda and Stuart G. Bigler

Abstract

A recent radar observation of a line of echoes associated with a fast-moving cold front is described. The novel feature of the observation was the complete absence of any precipitation and cloud formations to which the echoes would otherwise be attributed. Various conceivable explanations for the possible cause of the echoes are examined and it is concluded that the most plausible cause resides in microwave scattering by index of refraction gradients. A frontal model is deduced which, if correct, serves to explain efficient mixing of air of different refractive index. The meteorological significance of the observation is examined and suggestions offered for further work.

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Stanley A. Changnon and Stuart G. Bigler

Data collected in Illinois on the behavior of growing cumulus clouds and their associated radar echoes are reviewed and the results are compared to findings in other regions. It is shown that the data collection techniques used, involving two panoramic cameras and a RHI-type radar, were not too successful in Illinois because of the high cloud density on days of cumulus activity.

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Roger C. Whiton, Paul L. Smith, Stuart G. Bigler, Kenneth E. Wilk, and Albert C. Harbuck

Abstract

The second part of a history of the use of storm surveillance radars by operational military and civil weather services in the United States is presented. This part describes the genesis and evolution of two operational Doppler weather radars, the Next-Generation Weather Radar and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar.

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Roger C. Whiton, Paul L. Smith, Stuart G. Bigler, Kenneth E. Wilk, and Albert C. Harbuck

Abstract

The first part of a history of the use of storm surveillance radars by operational military and civil weather services in the United States is presented. The history of radar meteorological research is long and distinguished but already well described. Hence, this paper and its companion focus on the history of operational radar meteorology from its birth in World War II through the introduction of the first two operational Doppler weather radars. This part deals with the pre-Next-Generation Weather Radar era. An to this part contains what is known by the authors about the principal technical characteristics of most of the radars discussed in both parts.

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