Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Thomas J. Lockhart x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Thomas J. Lockhart

Abstract

It is necessary to understand, in detail, how an instrument works before methods can be designed or applied for calibration or auditing. This paper describes how a cup anemometer operates in a steady laminar flow and how some devices currently being used for field auditing may be based on erroneous assumptions.

Full access
Thomas J. Lockhart

Abstract

Full access
Thomas J. Lockhart

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
Thomas J. Lockhart

Abstract

Standard methods are tested for determining the starting threshold, distance, constant, transfer function and off-axis response of an anemometer. This fire use of the draft ASTM method provides data on the performance of a unique anemometer and experience with the test method. Consequently, changes in the test method are suggested.

Full access
Thomas J. Lockhart

Abstract

No abstract available.

Full access
Thomas J. Lockhart

Abstract

The application of collocated data collection for the purpose of estimating the accuracy of an operating wind instrument requires some baseline demonstrating the best agreement which can be expected. A series of data were carefully taken in 1982 from six different collocated wind instruments. The published reports of these data suggest that the best agreement from averaged wind speed measurements will be between 0.3 and 0.5 m s−1 and for wind direction will be 4 to 6 degrees.

A new analysis of the same data reduces the best expected agreement to about 0.2 m s−1 and 2 degrees. The several reasons for claiming the better potential accuracy for collocated measurement (auditing) with calibrated transfer standard instruments are discussed.

Full access
Thomas J. Lockhart
Full access