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Bruna Barbosa Silveira, Nadia Fourrié, Vincent Guidard, Philippe Chambon, Jean-François Mahfouf, Pierre Brousseau, Patrick Moll, Thomas August, and Tim Hultberg

Abstract

The main objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of assimilating satellite temperature and humidity soundings (aka Level 2 or L2 profiles), instead of radiances, from the EUMETSAT Advanced Retransmission Service (EARS) into the AROME-France data assimilation system. The satellite soundings are operational forecast-independent retrievals that used the infrared sounder IASI in synergy with its companion microwave instruments AMSU-A and MHS onboard the Metop platforms. In this assimilation study, L2 profiles are used as pseudo-radiosondes, discarding vertical error correlations and the instrument vertical sensitivity in the observation operator due to the the lack of available averaging kernels. Three assimilation experiments were performed, the baseline (including all satellite radiances except those from IASI, AMSU-A and MHS sounders), the control (with observations from the baseline plus IASI, AMSU-A and MHS radiances) and the L2 experiment (with observations from the baseline and L2 temperature and humidity profiles). The assimilation runs cover the periods of the winter 2017 and summer 2018. The forecast skills of the three experiments are gauged against independent analyses and observations. Despite that the vertical observation operator is not accounted for in this study, it is found that L2 profile assimilation does not have a negative impact on 1-hour temperature and humidity forecasts, especially in the mid-troposphere. Their impacts are comparable in magnitude to the radiance ones in the operational AROME framework, except in terms of temperature and wind fields during winter where the impact is more negative than positive. These findings encourage further investigations.

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Bruna Barbosa Silveira, Nadia Fourrié, Vincent Guidard, Philippe Chambon, Jean-François Mahfouf, Pierre Brousseau, Patrick Moll, Thomas August, and Tim Hultberg

Abstract

The main objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of assimilating satellite temperature and humidity soundings (aka Level 2 or L2 profiles), instead of radiances, from the EUMETSAT Advanced Retransmission Service (EARS) into the AROME-France data assimilation system. The satellite soundings are operational forecast-independent retrievals that used the infrared sounder IASI in synergy with its companion microwave instruments AMSU-A and MHS on board the MetOp platforms. In this assimilation study, L2 profiles are used as pseudoradiosondes, discarding vertical error correlations and the instrument vertical sensitivity in the observation operator due to the lack of available averaging kernels. Three assimilation experiments were performed, the baseline (including all satellite radiances except those from IASI, AMSU-A, and MHS sounders), the control (with observations from the baseline plus IASI, AMSU-A, and MHS radiances), and the L2 experiment (with observations from the baseline and L2 temperature and humidity profiles). The assimilation runs cover the periods of the winter 2017 and summer 2018. The forecast skills of the three experiments are gauged against independent analyses and observations. Despite that the vertical observation operator is not accounted for in this study, it is found that L2 profile assimilation does not have a negative impact on 1-h temperature and humidity forecasts, especially in the midtroposphere. Their impacts are comparable in magnitude to the radiance ones in the operational AROME framework, except in terms of temperature and wind fields during winter where the impact is more negative than positive. These findings encourage further investigations.

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K. Dieter Klaes, Jörg Ackermann, Craig Anderson, Yago Andres, Thomas August, Régis Borde, Bojan Bojkov, Leonid Butenko, Alessandra Cacciari, Dorothée Coppens, Marc Crapeau, Stephanie Guedj, Olivier Hautecoeur, Tim Hultberg, Rüdiger Lang, Stefanie Linow, Christian Marquardt, Rosemarie Munro, Carlo Pettirossi, Gabriele Poli, Francesca Ticconi, Olivier Vandermarcq, Mayte Vasquez, and Margarita Vazquez-Navarro

Abstract

After successful launch in November 2018 and successful commissioning of Metop-C, all three satellites of the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) are in orbit together and operational. EPS is part of the Initial Joint Polar System (IJPS) with the US (NOAA) and provides the service in the mid-morning orbit. The Metop satellites carry a mission payload of sounding and imaging instruments, which allow provision of support to operational meteorology and climate monitoring which are the main mission objectives for EPS. Applications include Numerical Weather Prediction, atmospheric composition monitoring, and marine meteorology. Climate monitoring is supported through the generation of long time series through the program duration of 20+ years. The payload was developed and contributed by partners, including NOAA, CNES, and ESA. EUMETSAT and ESA developed the space segment in cooperation. The system has proven its value since the first satellite Metop-A, with enhanced products at high reliability for atmospheric sounding, delivered a very strong positive impact on NWP and results beyond expectations for atmospheric composition and chemistry applications. Having multiple satellites in orbit - now three, has enabled enhanced and additional products with increased impact, like atmospheric motion vector products at latitudes not accessible to geostationary observations or increased probability of radio-occultations and hence atmospheric soundings with the GRAS instruments. The paper gives an overview on the system, the embarked payload and discusses the benefits of generated products for applications and services. The conclusions point to the follow-on system, currently under development and assuring continuity for another 20+ years.

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K. Dieter Klaes, Jörg Ackermann, Craig Anderson, Yago Andres, Thomas August, Régis Borde, Bojan Bojkov, Leonid Butenko, Alessandra Cacciari, Dorothée Coppens, Marc Crapeau, Stephanie Guedj, Olivier Hautecoeur, Tim Hultberg, Rüdiger Lang, Stefanie Linow, Christian Marquardt, Rosemarie Munro, Carlo Pettirossi, Gabriele Poli, Francesca Ticconi, Olivier Vandermarcq, Mayte Vasquez, and Margarita Vazquez-Navarro

Abstract

After successful launch in November 2018 and successful commissioning of Metop-C, all three satellites of the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) are in orbit together and operational. EPS is part of the Initial Joint Polar System (IJPS) with the United States (NOAA) and provides the service in the midmorning orbit. The Metop satellites carry a mission payload of sounding and imaging instruments, which allow provision of support to operational meteorology and climate monitoring, which are the main mission objectives for EPS. Applications include numerical weather prediction, atmospheric composition monitoring, and marine meteorology. Climate monitoring is supported through the generation of long time series through the program duration of 20+ years. The payload was developed and contributed by partners, including NOAA, CNES, and ESA. EUMETSAT and ESA developed the space segment in cooperation. The system has proven its value since the first satellite Metop-A, with enhanced products at high reliability for atmospheric sounding, delivered a very strong positive impact on NWP and results beyond expectations for atmospheric composition and chemistry applications. Having multiple satellites in orbit—now three—has enabled enhanced and additional products with increased impact, like atmospheric motion vector products at latitudes not accessible to geostationary observations or increased probability of radio occultations and hence atmospheric soundings with the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Radio-Occultation Atmospheric Sounder (GRAS) instruments. The paper gives an overview of the system and the embarked payload and discusses the benefits of generated products for applications and services. The conclusions point to the follow-on system, currently under development and assuring continuity for another 20+ years.

Full access