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  • Author or Editor: V. Khattatov x
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N. A. Krotkov, I. V. Geogdzhaev, N. Ye Chubarova, S. V. Bushnev, V. U. Khattatov, and T. V. Kondranin

Abstract

A program package for the management and analysis of spectral ultraviolet radiation (UV) data on an IBM-compatible PC is described. The present version can accommodate data from UV spectroradiometers operating in Russia, the U.S. National Science Foundation Polar Programs UV Spectroradiometer Network, and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Ozone and UV Data Center, located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The package manages compact databases of measured UV spectra and supporting meteorological information and has tools for visualization, statistical analysis, calculation of biologically effective doses, and a simple built-in radiative transfer model. In this paper, the program structure and the user interface are discussed. Examples of the program's operation using spectral data from three spectroradiometers (SUVS-M, Central Aerological Observatory, Russia; Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University, Russia; NSF Network, United States) illustrate the program's capabilities. Comparisons of the experimental spectral data with the results of the built-in radiative transfer model simulations are illustrated.

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L. Stefanutti, L. Sokolov, S. Balestri, A. R. MacKenzie, and V. Khattatov

Abstract

The authors describe the Russian Stratospheric Aircraft M-55 Geophysica, an important new platform for earth observation, and describe some technical details of its inaugural mission. The M-55 has successfully conducted scientific test flights in Pratica di Mare, Rome, in November 1996, and the first Airborne Polar Experiment (APE 1) from 19 December 1996 to 16 January 1997 from Rovaniemi in northern Finland. Three test flights were carried out at Pratica di Mare, and seven scientific mission flights during APE 1, when “quasi-Lagrangian” flight paths (flights in the wind direction, assuming the stratosphere to be stationary over the flight period) and lee wave flight paths were employed. Combined sorties of the M-55 Geophysica and the DLR Falcon were performed, the latter acting as a pathfinder for the former, guiding it to small regions of intense polar stratospheric cloud activity. These small cloud patches are associated with intense atmospheric wave activity over the Scandinavian mountains and other mountain ranges, and have been implicated in the observed depletion of stratospheric ozone. The Geophysica is well suited to probing atmospheric physics and chemistry in the harsh environment of these clouds.

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Jonathan D. W. Kahl, Nina A. Zaitseva, V. Khattatov, R. C. Schnell, Dina M. Bacon, Jason Bacon, V. Radionov, and M. C. Serreze

An historical archive of over 25 000 radiosonde observations from the former Soviet “North Pole” series of drifting ice stations has been compiled and made available to interested researchers. This archive is the only long-term set of meteorological sounding data over the Arctic Ocean. The digital archive is a result of the multiyear, collaborative efforts of a group of United States and Russian scientists and keypunch operators working under the auspices of Working Group VIII, an area of study within the United States–Russian Federation Agreement for Protection of the Environment and Natural Resources. The archive contains soundings from 21 drifting stations over the period 1954–90 and is being distributed by the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado.

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