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W. A. Matthews

Abstract

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G.-K. Plattner
,
R. Knutti
,
F. Joos
,
T. F. Stocker
,
W. von Bloh
,
V. Brovkin
,
D. Cameron
,
E. Driesschaert
,
S. Dutkiewicz
,
M. Eby
,
N. R. Edwards
,
T. Fichefet
,
J. C. Hargreaves
,
C. D. Jones
,
M. F. Loutre
,
H. D. Matthews
,
A. Mouchet
,
S. A. Müller
,
S. Nawrath
,
A. Price
,
A. Sokolov
,
K. M. Strassmann
, and
A. J. Weaver

Abstract

Eight earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) are used to project climate change commitments for the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC’s) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4). Simulations are run until the year 3000 a.d. and extend substantially farther into the future than conceptually similar simulations with atmosphere–ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) coupled to carbon cycle models. In this paper the following are investigated: 1) the climate change commitment in response to stabilized greenhouse gases and stabilized total radiative forcing, 2) the climate change commitment in response to earlier CO2 emissions, and 3) emission trajectories for profiles leading to the stabilization of atmospheric CO2 and their uncertainties due to carbon cycle processes. Results over the twenty-first century compare reasonably well with results from AOGCMs, and the suite of EMICs proves well suited to complement more complex models. Substantial climate change commitments for sea level rise and global mean surface temperature increase after a stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gases and radiative forcing in the year 2100 are identified. The additional warming by the year 3000 is 0.6–1.6 K for the low-CO2 IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) B1 scenario and 1.3–2.2 K for the high-CO2 SRES A2 scenario. Correspondingly, the post-2100 thermal expansion commitment is 0.3–1.1 m for SRES B1 and 0.5–2.2 m for SRES A2. Sea level continues to rise due to thermal expansion for several centuries after CO2 stabilization. In contrast, surface temperature changes slow down after a century. The meridional overturning circulation is weakened in all EMICs, but recovers to nearly initial values in all but one of the models after centuries for the scenarios considered. Emissions during the twenty-first century continue to impact atmospheric CO2 and climate even at year 3000. All models find that most of the anthropogenic carbon emissions are eventually taken up by the ocean (49%–62%) in year 3000, and that a substantial fraction (15%–28%) is still airborne even 900 yr after carbon emissions have ceased. Future stabilization of atmospheric CO2 and climate change requires a substantial reduction of CO2 emissions below present levels in all EMICs. This reduction needs to be substantially larger if carbon cycle–climate feedbacks are accounted for or if terrestrial CO2 fertilization is not operating. Large differences among EMICs are identified in both the response to increasing atmospheric CO2 and the response to climate change. This highlights the need for improved representations of carbon cycle processes in these models apart from the sensitivity to climate change. Sensitivity simulations with one single EMIC indicate that both carbon cycle and climate sensitivity related uncertainties on projected allowable emissions are substantial.

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P. Friedlingstein
,
P. Cox
,
R. Betts
,
L. Bopp
,
W. von Bloh
,
V. Brovkin
,
P. Cadule
,
S. Doney
,
M. Eby
,
I. Fung
,
G. Bala
,
J. John
,
C. Jones
,
F. Joos
,
T. Kato
,
M. Kawamiya
,
W. Knorr
,
K. Lindsay
,
H. D. Matthews
,
T. Raddatz
,
P. Rayner
,
C. Reick
,
E. Roeckner
,
K.-G. Schnitzler
,
R. Schnur
,
K. Strassmann
,
A. J. Weaver
,
C. Yoshikawa
, and
N. Zeng

Abstract

Eleven coupled climate–carbon cycle models used a common protocol to study the coupling between climate change and the carbon cycle. The models were forced by historical emissions and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A2 anthropogenic emissions of CO2 for the 1850–2100 time period. For each model, two simulations were performed in order to isolate the impact of climate change on the land and ocean carbon cycle, and therefore the climate feedback on the atmospheric CO2 concentration growth rate. There was unanimous agreement among the models that future climate change will reduce the efficiency of the earth system to absorb the anthropogenic carbon perturbation. A larger fraction of anthropogenic CO2 will stay airborne if climate change is accounted for. By the end of the twenty-first century, this additional CO2 varied between 20 and 200 ppm for the two extreme models, the majority of the models lying between 50 and 100 ppm. The higher CO2 levels led to an additional climate warming ranging between 0.1° and 1.5°C.

All models simulated a negative sensitivity for both the land and the ocean carbon cycle to future climate. However, there was still a large uncertainty on the magnitude of these sensitivities. Eight models attributed most of the changes to the land, while three attributed it to the ocean. Also, a majority of the models located the reduction of land carbon uptake in the Tropics. However, the attribution of the land sensitivity to changes in net primary productivity versus changes in respiration is still subject to debate; no consensus emerged among the models.

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Bart Geerts
,
Scott E. Giangrande
,
Greg M. McFarquhar
,
Lulin Xue
,
Steven J. Abel
,
Jennifer M. Comstock
,
Susanne Crewell
,
Paul J. DeMott
,
Kerstin Ebell
,
Paul Field
,
Thomas C. J. Hill
,
Alexis Hunzinger
,
Michael P. Jensen
,
Karen L. Johnson
,
Timothy W. Juliano
,
Pavlos Kollias
,
Branko Kosovic
,
Christian Lackner
,
Ed Luke
,
Christof Lüpkes
,
Alyssa A. Matthews
,
Roel Neggers
,
Mikhail Ovchinnikov
,
Heath Powers
,
Matthew D. Shupe
,
Thomas Spengler
,
Benjamin E. Swanson
,
Michael Tjernström
,
Adam K. Theisen
,
Nathan A. Wales
,
Yonggang Wang
,
Manfred Wendisch
, and
Peng Wu

Abstract

One of the most intense air mass transformations on Earth happens when cold air flows from frozen surfaces to much warmer open water in cold-air outbreaks (CAOs), a process captured beautifully in satellite imagery. Despite the ubiquity of the CAO cloud regime over high-latitude oceans, we have a rather poor understanding of its properties, its role in energy and water cycles, and its treatment in weather and climate models. The Cold-Air Outbreaks in the Marine Boundary Layer Experiment (COMBLE) was conducted to better understand this regime and its representation in models. COMBLE aimed to examine the relations between surface fluxes, boundary layer structure, aerosol, cloud, and precipitation properties, and mesoscale circulations in marine CAOs. Processes affecting these properties largely fall in a range of scales where boundary layer processes, convection, and precipitation are tightly coupled, which makes accurate representation of the CAO cloud regime in numerical weather prediction and global climate models most challenging. COMBLE deployed an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility at a coastal site in northern Scandinavia (69°N), with additional instruments on Bear Island (75°N), from December 2019 to May 2020. CAO conditions were experienced 19% (21%) of the time at the main site (on Bear Island). A comprehensive suite of continuous in situ and remote sensing observations of atmospheric conditions, clouds, precipitation, and aerosol were collected. Because of the clouds’ well-defined origin, their shallow depth, and the broad range of observed temperature and aerosol concentrations, the COMBLE dataset provides a powerful modeling testbed for improving the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in large-eddy simulations and large-scale models.

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Adam C. Varble
,
Stephen W. Nesbitt
,
Paola Salio
,
Joseph C. Hardin
,
Nitin Bharadwaj
,
Paloma Borque
,
Paul J. DeMott
,
Zhe Feng
,
Thomas C. J. Hill
,
James N. Marquis
,
Alyssa Matthews
,
Fan Mei
,
Rusen Öktem
,
Vagner Castro
,
Lexie Goldberger
,
Alexis Hunzinger
,
Kevin R. Barry
,
Sonia M. Kreidenweis
,
Greg M. McFarquhar
,
Lynn A. McMurdie
,
Mikhail Pekour
,
Heath Powers
,
David M. Romps
,
Celeste Saulo
,
Beat Schmid
,
Jason M. Tomlinson
,
Susan C. van den Heever
,
Alla Zelenyuk
,
Zhixiao Zhang
, and
Edward J. Zipser

Abstract

The Cloud, Aerosol, and Complex Terrain Interactions (CACTI) field campaign was designed to improve understanding of orographic cloud life cycles in relation to surrounding atmospheric thermodynamic, flow, and aerosol conditions. The deployment to the Sierras de Córdoba range in north-central Argentina was chosen because of very frequent cumulus congestus, deep convection initiation, and mesoscale convective organization uniquely observable from a fixed site. The C-band Scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Precipitation Radar was deployed for the first time with over 50 ARM Mobile Facility atmospheric state, surface, aerosol, radiation, cloud, and precipitation instruments between October 2018 and April 2019. An intensive observing period (IOP) coincident with the RELAMPAGO field campaign was held between 1 November and 15 December during which 22 flights were performed by the ARM Gulfstream-1 aircraft. A multitude of atmospheric processes and cloud conditions were observed over the 7-month campaign, including numerous orographic cumulus and stratocumulus events; new particle formation and growth producing high aerosol concentrations; drizzle formation in fog and shallow liquid clouds; very low aerosol conditions following wet deposition in heavy rainfall; initiation of ice in congestus clouds across a range of temperatures; extreme deep convection reaching 21-km altitudes; and organization of intense, hail-containing supercells and mesoscale convective systems. These comprehensive datasets include many of the first ever collected in this region and provide new opportunities to study orographic cloud evolution and interactions with meteorological conditions, aerosols, surface conditions, and radiation in mountainous terrain.

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