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Werner Schwerdtfeger
and
Uwe Radok

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Werner Schwerdtfeger
and
Uwe Radok

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Werner Schwerdtfeger
and
Frits Prohash

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Werner Schwerdtfeger
and
David W. Martin

Abstract

Data from all available sources have been used to construct vertical cross sections of the seasonal mean flow of the atmosphere between 900 and 30 mb, over the western and southern part of South America. Monthly zonal wind profiles are presented for the subpolar region where the stratospheric circumpolar westerlies in late winter are strongest. For these latitudes, an extrapolation of the zonal wind up to the 10-mb level is attempted.

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WERNER SCHWERDTFEGER
and
NORTON D. STROMMEN

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WERNER SCHWERDTFEGER
and
NORTON D. STROMMEN

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WERNER SCHWERDTFEGER
and
NORTON D. STROMMEN

Abstract

Hourly aerological soundings released at Bedford, Mass. in April 1960, together with all available conventional synoptic observations, are used for a detailed analysis of a cold front south of the center of a northeastward-moving depression. It is shown that in this case the dynamically important change from one air mass to another throughout the entire troposphere occurred several hours after the passage of a weak surface cold front. The major cooling over Bedford presented itself in a nearly vertical column from about 500 m. above the ground to heights of around 8 km., with the main decrease of temperature at the surface occurring during the following two hours.

It is suggested that this case is not an exceptional one, but that it rather may reflect the typical structure of a strong cold air invasion near the center of a depression in which the horizontal wind component normal to the front increases with height. Under such conditions an analysis according to the classical Norwegian scheme, with the wedge-shaped cold air mass, would be unrealistic.

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