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Xianglei Huang and Yuk Ling Yung

Abstract

In response to a comment on their previous note about the Voigt line profile, here the authors clarify relevant statements and numeric algorithms in the original note.

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Xianglei Huang and Yuk Ling Yung

Abstract

In this short note, a misinterpretation of the Voigt line profile is pointed out, which is in several popular textbooks of atmospheric physics. The correct interpretation is given based on mathematical and physical arguments, as well as numerical verification.

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Wei-Chyung Wang, Joseph P. Pinto, and Yuk Ling Yung

Abstract

Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, we perform a sensitivity study of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by ∼0.2 K due to chlorofluoromethane-induced ozone depletion at steady state (assuming 1973 release rates). This cooling reduces significantly the greenhouse effect due to the presence of chlorofluoromethanes. Carbon tetrafluoride has a strong ν3 band at 7.8 μm, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect is shown to be 0.07 and 0.12 K (ppbv)−1 with and without taking into account overlap with CH4 and N2O bands. At concentration higher than l ppbv, absorption by the ν3 band starts to saturate and the greenhouse effect becomes less efficient.

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Michael B. McElroy, Nien Dak Sze, and Yuk Ling Yung

Abstract

Carbon monoxide, produced in the Venus atmosphere by photolysis of CO2, is removed mainly by reaction with OH. The radical OH is formed in part by photolysis of H2O2, in part by reaction of 0 with H02. Photolysis of HCl provides a major source of H radicals near the visible clouds of Venus and plays a major role in the overall photochemistry. The mixing ratio of 02 is estimated to be approximately 10−7, about a factor of 10 less than a recent observational upper limit reported by Traub and Carleton. A detailed model, which accounts for the photochemical stability of Venus CO2, is presented and discussed.

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