Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Zachariah Adelman x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Francis S. Binkowski, Saravanan Arunachalam, Zachariah Adelman, and Joseph P. Pinto

Abstract

A prototype online photolysis module has been developed for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. The module calculates actinic fluxes and photolysis rates (j values) at every vertical level in each of seven wavelength intervals from 291 to 850 nm, as well as the total surface irradiance and aerosol optical depth within each interval. The module incorporates updated opacity at each time step, based on changes in local ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and particle concentrations. The module is computationally efficient and requires less than 5% more central processing unit time than using the existing CMAQ “lookup” table method for calculating j values. The main focus of the work presented here is to describe the new online module as well as to highlight the differences between the effective cross sections from the lookup-table method currently being used and the updated effective cross sections from the new online approach. Comparisons of the vertical profiles for the photolysis rates for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) from the new online module with those using the effective cross sections from a standard CMAQ simulation show increases in the rates of both NO2 and O3 photolysis.

Full access
Charles O. Stanier, R. Bradley Pierce, Maryam Abdi-Oskouei, Zachariah E. Adelman, Jay Al-Saadi, Hariprasad D. Alwe, Timothy H. Bertram, Gregory R. Carmichael, Megan B. Christiansen, Patricia A. Cleary, Alan C. Czarnetzki, Angela F. Dickens, Marta A. Fuoco, Dagen D. Hughes, Joseph P. Hupy, Scott J. Janz, Laura M. Judd, Donna Kenski, Matthew G. Kowalewski, Russell W. Long, Dylan B. Millet, Gordon Novak, Behrooz Roozitalab, Stephanie L. Shaw, Elizabeth A. Stone, James Szykman, Lukas Valin, Michael Vermeuel, Timothy J. Wagner, Andrew R. Whitehill, and David J. Williams

Abstract

The Lake Michigan Ozone Study 2017 (LMOS 2017) was a collaborative multi-agency field study targeting ozone chemistry, meteorology, and air quality observations in the southern Lake Michigan area. The primary objective of LMOS 2017 was to provide measurements to improve air quality modeling of the complex meteorological and chemical environment in the region. LMOS 2017 science questions included spatiotemporal assessment of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission sources and their influence on ozone episodes, the role of lake breezes, contribution of new remote sensing tools such as GeoTASO, Pandora, and TEMPO to air quality management, and evaluation of photochemical grid models. The observing strategy included GeoTASO on board the NASA UC-12 capturing NO2 and formaldehyde columns, an in situ profiling aircraft, two ground-based coastal enhanced monitoring locations, continuous NO2 columns from coastal Pandora instruments, and an instrumented research vessel. Local photochemical ozone production was observed on 2 June, 9–12 June, and 14–16 June, providing insights on the processes relevant to state and federal air quality management. The LMOS 2017 aircraft mapped significant spatial and temporal variation of NO2 emissions as well as polluted layers with rapid ozone formation occurring in a shallow layer near the Lake Michigan surface. Meteorological characteristics of the lake breeze were observed in detail and measurements of ozone, NOx, nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, VOC, oxygenated VOC (OVOC), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) composition were conducted. This article summarizes the study design, directs readers to the campaign data repository, and presents a summary of findings.

Full access