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Régis Borde, Olivier Hautecoeur, and Manuel Carranza

initially tested with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on NOAA satellites ( Turner and Warren 1989 ) and then with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua satellites ( Key et al. 2003 ). However, despite the operational production of AMVs over polar regions, a gap of AMVs observations still exists in the 55°–70° mid- to high-latitude bands north and south between the coverage areas of geostationary and polar AMVs. The European Organisation for

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Philippe Bordes, Pascal Brunel, and Anne Marsouin

FEBRUARY 1992 BORDES ET AL. 15Automatic Adjustment of AVHRR NavigationPHILIPPE BORDES, * PASCAL BRUNEL, AND ANNE MARSOUINMETEOFRANCE Centre de M~tdorologie Spatiale, Lannion, France(Manuscript received 10 January 1991, in final form 27 June 1991) ABSTRACT An automatic adjustment method of the Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR

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Andrew K. Heidinger, Michael J. Foster, Andi Walther, and Xuepeng (Tom) Zhao

This article describes the PATMOS-x cloud climate data record, focusing on the methods used to minimize inter-satellite artifacts. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Pathfinder Atmospheres–Extended (PATMOS-x) project provides a new satellite-based climate dataset that is now available to the public. As the name implies, the focus of PATMOS-x is on atmospheric applications including clouds and aerosols. PATMOS-x also

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Peter Koepke

DECEMBER 1989 NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE 1341Removal of Atmospheric Effects from AVHRR Albedos PETER KOEPKEUniversitaet Muenchen, Meteorologisches lnstitut, Muenchen, Federal Republic of Germany17 March 1989 and 10 July 1989 ABSTRACT Based on numerical simulations, coefficients are determined to be used in a linear relationship between clearsky planetary albedo and

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T. J. Schmugge and G. M. Schmidt

not yield agreement to the ground measurements within their ±3°C criteria, whereas the results from the two radiative transfer approaches did satisfy the criteria in half of the cases. In general they found that the land surface temperatures derived from the AVHRR data were higher than the ground measurements. This disagreement with the ground measurements was also found in an analysis done by Steyn-Ross et al. (1996) working the FIFE data from 1989. They found an rms difference of about 3°C for

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J. E. Dick O’Donnell

instruments. In addition, measurement of the currents in even a small area a long distance from shore can be extremely expensive because these methods require on-site deployments. Currently, the only feasible method for obtaining a synoptic view of the ocean surface is through satellite remote sensing. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board the Television Infrared Observation Satellite—N (TIROS-N)/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) series of weather satellites

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Jeffrey R. Key and Janet M. Intrieri

turn, create uncertainties in estimates of radiative fluxes. For example, applying the methods described in Key (1999) to summertime, subarctic and Arctic advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data, an incorrect determination of cloud phase can result in errors of 20%–100% in the retrieval of particle effective radius r e (the ratio of the third to the second moments of the particle size distribution) and optical depth for scenes with approximately equal amounts of liquid and solid

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R. W. Lindsay and D. A. Rothrock

174 JOURNAL OF CLIMATE VOLUME7Arctic Sea Ice Surface Temperature from AVHRR R. W. LINDSAY AND D. A. ROTHROCKPolar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, Coll~ge of Ocean and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington(Manuscript received 15 February 1993, in final form 28 May 1993)ABSTRACT The surface temperature of arctic sea ice is estimated using the infrared channels

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Olivier Hautecoeur and Régis Borde

). At EUMETSAT AMVs are derived operationally from Meteosat geostationary satellites and from the low-orbit MetOp satellites. AMVs are derived over polar regions using data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/3) on board MetOp-A and MetOp-B , and processed in the EUMETSAT Polar System (EPS) ground segment (GS). The standard polar wind extraction method proposed by Turner and Warren (1989) and Key et al. (2003) uses image triplets for the tracking. The MetOp polar winds

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R. W. Lindsay and D. A. Rothrock

NOVEMBER 1994 LINDSAY AND ROTHROCK 1737Arctic Sea Ice Albedo from AVHRR R. W. LINDSAY AND D. A. ROTHROCKPolar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington(Manuscript received 18 September 1993, in final form 10 March 1994) ABSTRACT The seasonal cycle of surface albedo of sea ice

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