Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,411 items for :

  • Atmospheric electricity x
  • All content x
Clear All
GEORGE C. SIMPSON

, 1905.ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY.By QEORI~E C. SIMPSON, hf. X.. Lecturer in meteorology in the University of Manchester, England. Ltated January 17. 1906.The study of nieteorology may be pursued with two entirelydifferent ends in view. We may pursue it for utilitarian pur-poses, or we may pursue i t as a pure science for the knowledgeto be derived froin it. It must be adinitted that there are anumber of so-called meteorologists whose point of view is theformer, ancl whose highest ambition is the

Full access

9ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY aT/~?ande,.-stontIs.-lst, Fln., Gn., Neb.Gth, Dnk., N. J., Ohio, l'n.2ud, Flit. 3rd, Fla., Ga., ⟩lo., Ala., N. C., Tenn. 4tl1, Fln., N.8 t h Dnk., Kau., Fla., Ga., Ill., La.,loth, Cnl., Iud., Ky., Mo., 12th,13tll, Dak., Ind. T., Knn., Ill., Ind.. Iowa, Mo., Neb., Ohio, Va. 16th, Fh., Ill.,lGth, Dnk., Ind.17th, Dnk., Icttn., Iown., La., Mo., Ncb., N. J., Iud. Ty., Ala.19th, Ill., Ind., Iowa., Icnn.. Lti., Mich., No., Ohio, Pn., Tex.,20th, Dnk., N. Y., Del., Gn., Ill

Full access

, Little Rock,ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY.Ark.; Biloxi, Miss.; Fort Stanton, N. Mex. 6th, Clayton and Egg Harbor City, N. J. Pth, Wilson, Kans.; Woodstock, Md.; Kalamazoo, Mich. 8th,Fort Buford, Dak. 9th, Savannah, Qa. loth, Stateburg, S. 0. l l t h , Wilson and Pates Center,,Kans.; East Portland, Oregon ; Quakertown, Pa.; Stateburg, S. C.; Unirersity of Virginia, Va. 12tb, Archer and Cedar Keys, Fla.; Lebo and Wilson, Kans.; Beverly, N. J.; Charlotte,AURORAS.Auroras were observed during the month as

Full access

flightswere made to a height of five-eighths of a mile or more. Aerial sound-iugs u ithin the rcgion of high barometric pressure over this patt of theAtlantic have never been made heretofore and are expected to giveInteresting results.ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY.The various difficulties attending the measurement of at-mospheric electricity and the details of the best methods ofthe present time are briefly mentioned in the English journalNature, May 25,1905, in an article by Mr. George C. Simpson,who concludes

Full access

OGTOBEB, 1894. MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW. 416ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY.QENERAL STATISTICS.The table showing in detail for October, 1894, the statis-tics relative to auroras and thunderstorms is placed among the meteorological tables as No. XI, instead of being given inthe text as heretofore. It shows the number of stations fromwhich meteorological .reports were received, and the numberof such stations reporting thiinderstornis (T ) and aiiroras (A)in each State and on each day of the month

Full access

luoutli was report'ecl the driestJiWliiWY siuce 1879. At Mount Cnrmel, Utah, and Eola, Ore-gon, the mo~it~li W i U reported very dry. At Sari Diego andSanta Cruz, Car., regetittion suffered for want of rain ; at SauDiego the drought was broken on the 28th.0 ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY.. 0 AURORAS.Auroras were reported as follows : 12th, Montevideo, Rliuu.16th, Orono, Me.; Wolsey, S. Dak. 18th, Albaug, Oregon.19th, Webster, S. Dak.THUNDER-STORMS.-0 Thunder-storms mere reported as folloms : east of the

Full access

of five minutes is given in Table I , which also givesthe altitude of Weather Bureau anemometers above ground.Following are the velocities of 50 miles and over per hourregistered during the month:Maximum wind vebcitzes.~~ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY.Stations.Numerical statistics relative to auroras and thunderstorms aregiven in Table IT, which shows the number of stations fromwhich meteorological reports were received, and the number ofsuch stations reporting thunderstorms-(T) and auroras (A) in

Full access

, ant1 arratige~nents are i nprogress for t.lieir diaplny at one or two prniiiiiiriit ~)uiiits in the city.ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY.AURORAS.Hocking v:lI1ey 111111 'rrJlt'llCJ r1tihOatl. I t iS h01⟩t*d that tlleg IllZLJ be phlCedDuring Jnlg, 18S4, oue hiinrlreil and twenty-two ciiiitioiiary siguals were ordered. Of these, ninety-seven, or iO.51 I'er ceut., IWIW jiistified by wiiids of twenty-five miles or niore ~ierlioiir at or within oiie liiuirlretl miles of the statinn. T

Full access

. \Vnshingto~i, N. H.; 12tl1,Creco, Iown; 10tl1, Atco, N. J.; 2Gtl1, Escannba and Alpenn, Mich.; 27th, Albiiny, N. Y.; 2Gth, during sand-storm ut Visnlia, Cnl., electricity intense; 28th, Santtl. Z'c, atmospheric electricity iuteuse, interferiug withworking of' line. Pike's Peak, the nesiEtaut ou stntion n t summit, i n uscet~ding the mouutuin encountered severeelectric storm n t timber line, in which his hair crackled, Hud he experienced a soverc buruing sensntion allOver the herid.dlagnelic Phenoniena

Full access

, Galveston, Memphis, San Francisco axid Norfolk.ATMOSPHERIC ELECTRICITY,Thunder-stornis were of rare occurrence. They are reported as follo\vs :' 12th, Fla., La., Tex.; 13th,Del., N. C., Va.; 17th, Kan.; 18th, Tex.; 19th, Fla., Ln., Miss., Ala.; 20t11, Ohio; 21st, N. C.; 22ud, Cal.;25th, Col., La.; 26th, Ark., Kan., Ind. Tcr.; 27th, Ill., N. C., Ohio, Vu., Ga.; 28th, S. C.; 29th, La., Miss.; 30th, Ga., Ala. An interesting series of thunder-storms waa reported by Prof'. Nipher of the MissouriWeather

Full access