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Bettina Steuri
,
Elisabeth Viktor
,
Juliane El Zohbi
, and
Daniela Jacob

The challenge for any successful service is to connect demand and supply in a meaningful way. In recent years, climate service has emerged as a new field tackling the supply and demand for customized climate change knowledge. As the need for customized climate change knowledge increases, so has the number of climate service providers as well as the market volume and the number of products available ( Cortekar et al. 2020a ). They aim to transform “climate-related data—together with other

Open access
Kwang-Hyung Kim
,
Chris D. Hewitt
,
Hideki Kanamaru
,
Jorge Alvar-Beltrán
,
Ana Heureux
,
Sook-Young Park
,
Min-Hye Jung
, and
Robert Stefanski

The COVID-19 pandemic created new challenges for food security, such as increased price volatility and destabilized supply chains due to labor shortages, restricted mobility, and general uncertainty, worsening the severity of preexisting food crises due to climate change ( FAO 2021 ; Phillips et al. 2020 ). In addition, the feasibility of conducting face-to-face services and providing farmers with weather-informed agricultural advisories has been reduced in many countries ( FAO 2020 ). While

Open access
Nick Dunstone
,
Julia Lockwood
,
Balakrishnan Solaraju-Murali
,
Katja Reinhardt
,
Eirini E. Tsartsali
,
Panos J. Athanasiadis
,
Alessio Bellucci
,
Anca Brookshaw
,
Louis-Philippe Caron
,
Francisco J. Doblas-Reyes
,
Barbara Früh
,
Nube González-Reviriego
,
Silvio Gualdi
,
Leon Hermanson
,
Stefano Materia
,
Andria Nicodemou
,
Dario Nicolì
,
Klaus Pankatz
,
Andreas Paxian
,
Adam Scaife
,
Doug Smith
, and
Hazel E. Thornton

Near-term climate prediction on the interannual to decadal time scale is a quickly maturing field of climate science that has the potential to provide key climate services that support government and industry sector users to make decisions in our rapidly changing climate. By initializing latest-generation coupled general circulation models (GCMs) with observational estimates of atmosphere, ocean, and sea ice conditions, skillful climate predictions have been recently demonstrated for both

Full access
Yujie Wang
,
Lianchun Song
,
Chris Hewitt
,
Nicola Golding
, and
Zili Huang

1. Introduction The climate is of critical importance to social and economic development and human well-being. Against the background of climate change and increasing vulnerability and exposure, society is facing unprecedented challenges in terms of climate risks ( IPCC 2014 ). To manage and reduce climate risks as well as improve societal resilience, the World Meteorological Organization initiated the Global Framework for Climate Services in 2009 ( Hewitt et al. 2012 ). In recent years

Open access
Frank Baffour-Ata
,
Philip Antwi-Agyei
,
Elias Nkiaka
,
Andrew J. Dougill
,
Alexander K. Anning
, and
Stephen Oppong Kwakye

Africa ( Pachauri et al. 2014 ). An important step toward improving the ability to manage climate-related hazards is the timely availability and usage of climate information services ( Vaughan and Dessai 2014 ; Antwi-Agyei et al. 2021a , b ). Climate information services are the ways in which climate information is made available to and useful for decision-makers across different sectors and at different scales ( WMO 2018 ). Climate information services provide institutions and people with timely

Open access
Carlo Buontempo
,
Samantha N. Burgess
,
Dick Dee
,
Bernard Pinty
,
Jean-Noël Thépaut
,
Michel Rixen
,
Samuel Almond
,
David Armstrong
,
Anca Brookshaw
,
Angel Lopez Alos
,
Bill Bell
,
Cedric Bergeron
,
Chiara Cagnazzo
,
Edward Comyn-Platt
,
Eduardo Damasio-Da-Costa
,
Anabelle Guillory
,
Hans Hersbach
,
András Horányi
,
Julien Nicolas
,
Andre Obregon
,
Eduardo Penabad Ramos
,
Baudouin Raoult
,
Joaquín Muñoz-Sabater
,
Adrian Simmons
,
Cornel Soci
,
Martin Suttie
,
Freja Vamborg
,
James Varndell
,
Stijn Vermoote
,
Xiaobo Yang
, and
Juan Garcés de Marcilla

). In this regard, climate science has undergone a “quiet revolution” similar to numerical weather prediction ( Bauer et al. 2015 ), which happened gradually as opposed to any single scientific breakthrough. Progress in weather analysis and forecasting has gone hand in hand with hugely improved operational services, guaranteeing ubiquitous access to weather data and value-added information products in support of governments, businesses, and the public, most of whom have the data literally at their

Free access
Adam A. Scaife
,
Elizabeth Good
,
Ying Sun
,
Zhongwei Yan
,
Nick Dunstone
,
Hong-Li Ren
,
Chaofan Li
,
Riyu Lu
,
Peili Wu
,
Zongjian Ke
,
Zhuguo Ma
,
Kalli Furtado
,
Tongwen Wu
,
Tianjun Zhou
,
Tyrone Dunbar
,
Chris Hewitt
,
Nicola Golding
,
Peiqun Zhang
,
Rob Allan
,
Kirstine Dale
,
Fraser C. Lott
,
Peter A. Stott
,
Sean Milton
,
Lianchun Song
, and
Stephen Belcher

Six years ago, we set up a partnership between climate scientists at the United Kingdom’s Met Office Hadley Centre, the China Meteorological Administration, and the Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Beijing via the U.K. Government’s Newton Fund. This Climate Science to Service Partnership (CSSP) is building a strong network of collaborating U.K. and Chinese climate scientists through an enhanced joint climate science program. The partnership focuses on collaborative research and innovation to

Full access
E. Baulenas
,
D. Bojovic
,
D. Urquiza
,
M. Terrado
,
S. Pickard
,
N. González
, and
A. L. St. Clair

1. Introduction “It became obvious . . . that neither decision makers nor scientists working alone can specify what science products are needed, how they should be developed, and how they should be applied to climate adaptation” ( Beier et al. 2017 , p. 289). Climate services demand is on the rise as a result of increasing awareness of the negative effects of climate change and the need for evidence-based responses ( Street et al. 2019 ). Globally, a wide range of institutions foster

Open access
Christina Greene
and
Daniel B. Ferguson

scales, it is notoriously difficult to define ( Redmond 2002 ), monitor ( Bachmair et al. 2016 ), and ultimately manage. In the face of this complexity the climate research and climate services communities tend to rely on drought indicators that are primarily focused on availability of moisture in a given system. How systems respond to dry conditions—drought impacts—has proven to be a much more difficult to monitor ( Meadow et al. 2013 ; Lackstrom et al. 2013 ; Bachmair et al. 2016 ). The concept

Open access
Juhyeong Han
,
Inyoung Jang
,
Daein Kang
,
Minju Baek
,
Hideki Kanamaru
, and
Kwang-Hyung Kim

FAO Asia–Pacific Agriculture Climate Service Week What : Around 270 participants from national agriculture, hydrological, and meteorological services; nongovernmental organizations; the private sector; and research institutions gathered to take stock of progress since the first Climate Services Week; to explore and highlight innovations in climate services that support transformative agri-food systems; to promote knowledge exchange, collaboration, and partnerships; and to develop a

Full access