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W. J. Teague, E. Jarosz, D. W. Wang, and D. A. Mitchell

1. Introduction The Naval Research Laboratory has conducted an intensive measurement program of the outer continental shelf and upper slope waters off the Gulf Coast as part of its Slope to Shelf Energetics and Exchange Dynamics (SEED) project ( Mitchell et al. 2005 ; Wang et al. 2005 ; Teague et al. 2006a ). A major goal of SEED is to understand the physical processes that control the exchange of mass, momentum, heat, and water properties across the shelf break. The shelf gently slopes from

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Deepak A. Cherian and K. H. Brink

1. Introduction Deep-water mesoscale anticyclonic eddies interact with continental shelf-slope topography in many parts of the world: for example, the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) off the northeastern United States ( Joyce et al. 1992 ), the Gulf of Alaska ( Okkonen et al. 2003 ), the east Australian shelf ( Tranter et al. 1986 ), and others. At the shelf break, these eddies export shelf water offshore (e.g., Fig. 1 ; Joyce et al. 1992 ) while also transporting eddy and slope waters on to the

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Jody M. Klymak, Matthew H. Alford, Robert Pinkel, Ren-Chieh Lien, Yung Jang Yang, and Tswen-Yung Tang

energy propagation of internal waves and dh / dx is the local topographic slope ( N is the local buoyancy frequency, ω is the tidal frequency and f is the Coriolis frequency). For subcritical slopes, presumably much of the energy scatters upslope onto the continental shelf, where it likely dissipates in shallow water, whereas for supercritical slopes an undetermined amount of energy will reflect back into the basin. In both cases, there is presently no method for predicting a priori how much

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Harvey Seim and Catherine Edwards

1. Introduction Shelfbreak and upper-slope jets (USJs) are relatively common features of the world’s broader continental shelves, being well characterized along the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB; e.g., Gawarkiewicz and Chapman 1992 ), the northwest European shelf (e.g., Pingree et al. 1982 ), and in the Arctic along the Beaufort Sea ( Nikolopoulos et al. 2009 ; von Appen and Pickart 2012 ). Density contrasts between the shelf and slope waters force these flows, with topographic steering causing

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A. Edward Hill

JULY 1995 H I L L 1617Leakage of Barotropic Slope Currents onto the Continental Shelf A. EDWARD HILLSchool of Ocean Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor, United Kingdom(Manuscript received 17 January 1994, in final form 30 August 1994)ABSTRACT The effect of alongshore variation in continental slope steepness upon the on-shelf penetration of barotropic,slope

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K. H. Brink

1. Introduction Strong surface cooling generally leads to a deep surface mixed layer because cold, dense surface water creates a gravitationally unstable water column. When this layer reaches to the bottom over the continental shelf, shallower waters cool faster than deeper waters, and a cross-shelf temperature (density) gradient develops. It is well understood from models (e.g., Whitehead 1981 ; Chapman and Gawarkiewicz 1997 ; Pringle 2001 ; Spall 2013 ) that this gradient gives rise to

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Dong-Ping Wang

1524 JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY VOLUt~ 12 NOTES AND. CORRESPONDENCE Effects of Continental Slope on the Mean Shelf Circulation DONC~PING WANG Energy and Environmental Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne. IL 60439 - 9 April 1982 and 6 August 1982 ABSTRACT Csanad-'s (1978) theory on the mean shelf circulation in a

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Deepak A. Cherian and K. H. Brink

coefficients. The main elements of the problem, namely, shelf–slope topography, anticyclonic eddy, and ambient stratification, are all reduced to the simplest possible form. The topography is constructed using three straight lines to bound the shelf, the continental slope, and the deep ocean. The deep-ocean bottom is always flat. A four-point running mean applied six times smooths the intersections at the shelf break and slope break. The term shelf break refers to the intersection of the shelf and

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Pritha Das and Jason H. Middleton

height, currents, and dissipation of energy on the shelf. By contrast Clarke and Battisti (1981), Battisti and Clarke (1982a , b) , and Church et al. (1985) have taken a constant slope approach (with the depth at the coast taken to be zero), but they did not match shelf and deep ocean solutions. On the other hand, they used coastal observation data to predict shelf tides and currents. Webb (1976) calculated the tidal response of the Patagonian continental shelf. In his model he considered a

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Nobuo Suginohara and Yoshiteru Kitamura

JUNE 1984 NOBUO SUGINOHARA AND YOSHITERU KITAMURA 1095Long-Term Coastal Upwelling over a Continental Shelf-Slope NOBUO SUGINOHARA AND YOSHITERU KITAMURAGeophysical Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113 Japan(Manuscript received 13 December 1983, in final form 19 March 1984)ABSTRACT Long-term coastal upwelling over a continental shelf-slope with emphasis on

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