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David Shankman
,
Barry D. Keim
,
Tadanobu Nakayama
,
Rongfang Li
,
Dunyin Wu
, and
W. Craig Remington

1. Introduction Poyang Lake in Jiangxi Province is the largest freshwater lake in China and is historically a region of severe floods. At its northern end, Poyang Lake drains into the Changjiang (Yangtze River), the longest river in China. The five major rivers in Jiangxi that flow into Poyang Lake have headwaters in the surrounding mountains ( Figure 1 ). During the summer wet season, May–September, the lake covers an area of 3800 km 2 , inundating the low-lying alluvial plains surrounding the

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Shithi Kamal-Heikman
,
Louis A. Derry
,
Jery R. Stedinger
, and
Christopher C. Duncan

1. Introduction The roles and interactions of climate factors in causing flooding in the lower Brahmaputra basin are not well understood. Improved predictions of monsoon flooding could reduce loss of life and economic damage. For example, the 1998 Brahmaputra–Ganges–Meghna flood inundated 69% of Bangladesh ( Mirza 2003 ), displacing over 30 million persons and causing over 1000 deaths ( DMB 1998 ). Of the three major rivers that contribute to flooding in Bangladesh, the Brahmaputra is the

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Alfred J. Kalyanapu
,
A. K. M. Azad Hossain
,
Jinwoo Kim
,
Wondmagegn Yigzaw
,
Faisal Hossain
, and
C. K. Shum

1. Introduction The growth and prosperity of human civilization over the centuries resulted in more than 40% of the world’s population living within 15 km of rivers ( Small and Cohen 2004 ), dramatically increasing the vulnerability to floods. By 2050, 70% of the world’s population is projected to be living in large cities ( Cohen 2003 ). With increasing urbanization and changing patterns of climate and extreme weather ( Burby 2001 ; McCarthy et al. 2001 ; Montz and Gruntfest 2002

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Felipe Quintero
,
Witold F. Krajewski
, and
Marcela Rojas

flooding is likely to affect communities are of particular importance. Alerts issued with enough lead time can help the community members prepare and thus lessen the flood consequences. In this study, we address this problem by proposing a methodology that establishes a discharge reference at any point in the drainage network. The goal is to provide guidance to determine the relative importance of forecasted streamflow, given a historically observed hydrological regime at gauged locations. The

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ALFRED J. HENRY

286Dktrlct.M1851@-SIPPl RIVEB.MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW.A m over- Bowed.SECTION IV.-RIVERS AND FLOODS.Jfiauwsi i. KZ&, Iowa ........................ Warsaw Ill .......................... PI,&.;. ....................... ........................ Loulsiaaa, Ma ................. ,. ..... DO ............................... ........................................................................Knowlton Wls ......................Boone,~owa.. ....................... Dss Yomes, Iowa

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ALFRED J. HENRY

116Mobile Ala.. Yont&mer ,Ala ...... Columbia C ......... Macon 0;Cairo,hl ...............MONTHLY WEA!l!HEB REVIEW.AH#&.......................................... 8200 %,a00 .......... Sa,= 8550 8 7 a m Oa, 8,eSO 11 110 4,000 17:#10 1,675 110 1:M...................................................... 5,000 .......... W.... ...... I 28,oOO 100 15,000 owBpan, 1917SECTIONEmEaS AND FLOODS, APEXL, 1911.By ALPBED J. HENRY, Profewor in Chsrge.[Dated: River and Flood Division, May 26,1917.1IV

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ALFRED J. HENRY

m m , 1918.hhIbrldgC, N. Y ................. --I 11Selingsgrove, Pa.. .................. 17Clewfield Pa ....................... 9Renoro i a ......................... I6Willdsport, PI ................... 20Pherl~unie, N. T .................... RSarprwhnnna ( Went Branch):Chrnanach'MONTHLY M'EATHER REVlElY.as 20as ........20........ 2025SECTION IV.-RIVERS AND FLOODS.pccact: Chemw, F. r ........................Riminl, S. C ......................... Forwon, 8. C.. ....................camden, s. c

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ALFRED J. HENRY

MAY, 1917.River.MONTHLT WEATHER REVIEW.-4boveflood I crest. Flood stsges-dates.iStation.I stage' From--( TO- I Stage. 1 Date.245Comwticut . . . . . . . .lsntee ..____._..____ Do _________._._GXEAT LAKZS.h a s ..__._.____..___ Grand.. . . . . . . . . . . . .SECTION IV.-RJYERS AND FLOODS.I Feel. Feet. White River Junction, 13 . . . . . . __ . . __. . __ 12.0 3Rimini, S.C _.._._____ I 12 __.._.__ ______.. 10.9 10,11 Feguson. S. I: .._____. 12 __..._._ __._._._ 10.8 11Vt.Vsssar, Mich ....___.__ I

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ALFRED J. HENRY

306............ Mississippi.C'olr;rarlo ............... White .................. \$'abash.. .................. Susqnelianua ...........MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW.627.41 (7 3 )SECTION IV.-RIVERS AND FLOODS................ ............Missouri Arkansas.. Tennessee.. ........... 1 Mississippi.. Arizona ............... Indiana ............... .dn.. .............. .INew Ynrli.. .......... I..........BIVEES AND FLOODS DUBIIW JUNE, 1017.By ALFRED J. HENRY. Professor in Charge.[Dated: River and Flood

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ALFRED J. HENRY

418 Rlver. Tar ..................... Alabama.. ............. Tallapoosa ............. Cottonwood ............ Smoky Hill ............ MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW. -- I ' ' Aboveflood rtages-daten. cmt. ,- -FWt. Greenvllle,N.C ........ 13 (t) 3 14.6 Selma Ala.. ............ 35 .............. 30.8 MUst&,Ala ........... I 40 7 8 46.0 Em oris Kans ......... 19 .............. 18.3 Linhmg, Kans ........ i 20 16 17 22.6 station. __ I FKt. 627.41 c 73) SECTION IV-RIVERS AND FLOODS. -Mean level during

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