Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 3,839 items for :

  • Ice loss/growth x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Peter Yu Feng Siew
,
Yutian Wu
,
Mingfang Ting
,
Cheng Zheng
,
Robin Clancy
,
Nathan T. Kurtz
, and
Richard Seager

Serreze 2020 ; Finocchio et al. 2022 ; Clancy et al. 2022 ). Nevertheless, a systematic approach identifying the most responsible circulation patterns and their physical processes shaping Barents–Kara sea ice loss and growth across multiple time scales is still missing. In the present study, we use a clustering approach, self-organizing maps (SOM), to identify various circulation patterns in the Euro-Atlantic sector that are important for day-to-day Barents–Kara sea ice changes (both ice loss and

Restricted access
Camille Hankel
and
Eli Tziperman

convection over open ocean to drive convection and deep convective clouds, the longwave (LW) radiative effect of which suppresses sea ice growth. Interestingly, we find here that downward LW radiation plays a significant role in affecting the abruptness of winter sea ice loss, but that while wintertime Arctic atmospheric convection indeed occurs in all models examined at high enough CO 2 , the LW cloud radiative effect does not seem to be a major player. Bathiany et al. (2016) looked closely at the

Full access
Lukas Strauss
,
Stefano Serafin
, and
Manfred Dorninger

paper presents a verification study of the skill and potential economic value of deterministic forecasts of ice growth (also, active icing ; Bredesen et al. 2017b ). The phase of active ice accumulation on blades has been associated with the strongest production losses (e.g., Bernstein et al. 2012 ; Bergström et al. 2013 ); it is also the sensitive phase during which preventive anti-icing can make a difference. Icing forecasts for the range up to day 3 are produced from global and limited

Free access
Xi Liang
,
Xichen Li
,
Haibo Bi
,
Martin Losch
,
Yongqi Gao
,
Fu Zhao
,
Zhongxiang Tian
, and
Chengyan Liu

ice volume in all seasons. The 〈 ω io 〉 and 〈 θ io 〉 terms peak in late autumn and early winter, because during this period the sea ice growth rate stays at a high level leaving dense (saline) surface water behind. The dense surface water leads to increased vertical convection and upward oceanic turbulent heat flux yielding more basal ice melt. Note that the enhanced sea ice area and volume losses during 6–10 August are caused by the so-called Great Arctic Cyclone of August 2012, which enhanced

Full access
Vanessa M. Przybylo
,
Kara J. Sulia
,
Zachary J. Lebo
, and
Carl G. Schmitt

1. Introduction The process of aggregation, or the collection of one or more ice crystals, deemed snow in this study, is a critical component in ice-microphysical parameterizations within cloud-resolving models due to the inherent size and mass of aggregates. A diverse range of sizes and shapes (habits) form in nature based on environmental growth conditions and advective transport strength, which leads to varied sedimentation velocities and easily attained precipitation-sized particles

Full access
Vaughan T. J. Phillips

liquid and cold ice. After t ˜ ≈ 1 , cloud liquid allows the growth of cold ice and warm rain by accretion of cloud liquid to prevail. Soon a balance is reached between riming loss and condensation for cloud liquid mass. A balance is also attained for cold ice mass between riming and sedimentation. Fig . 2. The trajectory (thick full line) of the simplified model for the standard case in the phase space for mass fields of (a) cloud liquid and cold ice and (b) cloud liquid and warm rain. For each

Restricted access
Daniel M. Hueholt
,
Sandra E. Yuter
, and
Matthew A. Miller

highlights the relationship between RH w and RH ice as a function of temperature. As air temperature decreases, the RH w needed to sustain an ice cloud shrinks as well. This is in contrast to the requirement that RH w ≥ 100% for liquid-phase and mixed-phase clouds. Ice supersaturation directly relates to ice growth through deposition, which can only occur above saturation with respect to ice, and ice loss through sublimation, which occurs when conditions are subsaturated with respect to ice

Free access
Will Hobbs
,
Paul Spence
,
Amelie Meyer
,
Serena Schroeter
,
Alexander D. Fraser
,
Philip Reid
,
Tian R. Tian
,
Zhaohui Wang
,
Guillaume Liniger
,
Edward W. Doddridge
, and
Philip W. Boyd

PCs are constructed, and not to the target variable of summer SIA. This means that the greater importance of PCs 3 and 4 over leading-order PCs for summer SIA is not necessarily inconsistent.) The eigenvectors of PCs 3 and 4 are shown in Fig. 5 . PC4 shows a relationship between June–July ZW3 and SAM/ASL throughout the March–September sea ice growth season, all indices which have been previously associated with the 2016/17 sea ice loss ( Stuecker et al. 2017 ; Schlosser et al. 2018 ; G. Wang

Open access
Jerry Y. Harrington
and
Gwenore F. Pokrifka

1. Introduction Vapor depositional growth is largely responsible for the variety of shapes (or habits) of ice crystals found in atmospheric cold clouds. The crystal sizes, shapes, and surface properties that result from vapor growth can have strong impacts on numerical cloud model simulations of ice-containing clouds ( Gierens et al. 2003 ; Woods et al. 2007 ; Avramov and Harrington 2010 ), on the optical properties of cloud systems ( Mitchell et al. 1996 ; Järvinen et al. 2018 ; van

Full access
Tingting Gong
and
Dehai Luo

( D. S. Park et al. 2015 ; Woods and Caballero 2016 ). Below, we will indicate that changes in the moisture flux convergence, total column water (TCW; liquid water plus ice), and associated downward IR over the BKS depend strongly on the evolution (growth and decay) of the UB pattern from a daily perspective. In particular, it is demonstrated that the intensified UB occurs together with enhanced positive SAT anomaly, downward IR, TCW, and moisture flux convergence over the BKS and its adjacent

Full access