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Leanne Giordono
,
Muhammad Usman Amin Siddiqi
,
Greg Stelmach
,
Chad Zanocco
,
June Flora
, and
Hilary Boudet

climate change, increasing wildfire risk in the western United States is connected to warmer and drier conditions, both of which are linked to climate change ( U.S. Global Change Research Program 2017 ). A majority of Americans express support for several mitigation-oriented policies, including renewables research, tax rebates, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) regulation ( Bergquist et al. 2020 ; Marlon et al. 2022 ). However, support for climate change mitigation policy continues to be marked by a

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Tori L. Jennings

1. Introduction At present the two principal policy approaches to global warming include actions to reduce the causes of climate change (mitigation) and adapting to the impacts of climate change (adaptation) ( Houghton et al. 2001 ; Metz et al. 2007 ). The kinds of policy agendas that mitigation and adaptation respond to are somewhat distinct. Whereas climate change mitigation is about preventing further global climate change, climate change adaptation is about coping with local climate change

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David Switzer
and
Arnold Vedlitz

1. Introduction Policies to solve environmental issues greatly depend on public support. The views, attitudes, beliefs, and values that citizens hold about issues, their public opinions, are important factors in the political and policy processes that identify problems and direct and limit public and private sector responses to those problems ( Baumgartner and Jones 2015 ). Research in environmental public opinion has recently recognized that a major influence on support for environmental

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Claire Cambardella
,
Brian D. Fath
,
Andrea Werdenigg
,
Christian Gulas
, and
Harald Katzmair

for the governments and agencies developing the plans. An understanding of national, regional, and local preferences for climate protection will be necessary in implementing a successful plan. Cultural theory (CT) provides a framework for understanding how social dimensions shape cultural bias and social relations of individuals, including values, views of the natural world, policy preferences, and risk perceptions ( Swedlow et al. 2016 ; Thompson et al. 1990 ). These biases will influence how

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Ellen Kohl
and
John A. Knox

methods and use our empirical data to demonstrate the policy outcomes resulting from stakeholders’ knowledge of drought and the societal context within which these knowledges are produced, circulated, and utilized. In conclusion, we discuss initial effects of HB 1281 and reflect on the importance of understanding how stakeholders’ knowledge of drought and the societal context influence policies. 2. Theoretical framing The management of water is both scientific and political ( Budds 2009 ; Bulkeley

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Samuel Tang
and
Suraje Dessai

1. Introduction Scientific expertise, knowledge, and progress are perceived to be key reference points in policy-making ( Braun and Kropp 2010 ; Kropp and Wagner 2010 ), making science a fundamental global commodity. In fact, within the United Kingdom demand for scientific information to support policy and investment decisions has grown rapidly ever since bold commitments were made in the white paper “1999 Modernizing Government,” in which the U.K. government invested significant political

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Judy Shamoun-Baranes
,
Silke Bauer
,
Jason W. Chapman
,
Peter Desmet
,
Adriaan M. Dokter
,
Andrew Farnsworth
,
Hans van Gasteren
,
Birgen Haest
,
Jarmo Koistinen
,
Bart Kranstauber
,
Felix Liechti
,
Tom H. E. Mason
,
Cecilia Nilsson
,
Raphael Nussbaumer
,
Baptiste Schmid
,
Nadja Weisshaupt
, and
Hidde Leijnse

The global rate of biodiversity loss has been raising serious concerns worldwide and ambitious international goals have been set to halt further biodiversity loss and restore biologically diverse and well-functioning ecosystems ( Díaz et al. 2020 ). Informing and assessing biodiversity policies, designed to meet international and national goals, require large-scale and long-term monitoring programs that quantify spatiotemporal changes to biodiversity and identify their drivers. Yet, despite

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S. Niggol Seo
and
Laura A. Bakkensen

. In section 5 , we describe and suggest adaptation strategies that are effective to a higher storm surge relative to those to higher storm intensity. The paper concludes with evaluations of the results and policy suggestions. 2. Theory and models To estimate a fatality function of tropical cyclones using highly dispersed fatality count data, previous literature has employed a negative binomial (NB) model with explanatory variables including minimum central pressure (MCP) and income ( Seo 2015

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Rachel Hauser

with developing a national weather modification policy in 1976 (Public Law 94-490), the Department of Commerce (DoC) recognized the need for better leadership and coordination of federal research. The resulting DoC policy report suggested that coordination occur under the Committee on Atmosphere and Oceans of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology, which provided advice to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s (OSTP) director ( U.S. Department

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Hege Westskog
,
Grete K. Hovelsrud
, and
Göran Sundqvist

particular exposure or hazards of a specific location. Added to the uncertainty about impacts are inherent and complex uncertainties in climate projections that increase as the resolution becomes finer. Nevertheless, regional-scale projections show clear trends of increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns, which in turn will require adaptation. Climate change is a fuzzy decision-making context with a more pronounced uncertainty than other policy areas as pointed out by Lempert et al

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