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Kathleen Sherman-Morris
,
Holly Lussenden
,
Alexandra Kent
, and
Caroline MacDonald

emphasis in the scientific community on the importance of interdisciplinary study, and this has not escaped the fields of meteorology and climatology. Interdisciplinary publications focusing on climate change research increased at a higher rate than all publications on climate change since the 1940s ( Xu et al. 2016 ). There has also been a somewhat successful push to integrate social science and meteorology. The Weather and Society Integrated Studies program (more commonly known as WAS*IS) was founded

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Keely Maxwell
,
Emily Eisenhauer
, and
Allyza Lustig

1. Introduction Climate assessment reports are large-scale endeavors that evaluate the state of the science to inform the public and policy makers and address specific information or decision needs ( National Research Council 2007 ). Early assessments sought to provide authoritative biogeophysical science on questions surrounding whether climate change was a serious physical phenomenon, its causes, and consequences. Social and behavioral sciences are essential to understanding climate

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Ezana Amdework Atsbeha
,
Elizabeth Holzer
,
Emmanouil Anagnostou
,
Paul Block
,
Sarah Alexander
,
Selam Esayas Negatu
, and
Kristen Kirksey

what about coproduction and using culturally grounded practices produces these good outcomes? Previous studies highlight two productive mechanisms: information sharing and trust in social ties ( Özer et al. 2011 ; Gbangou et al. 2020 ). Our work draws insights from the sociology of emotions ( Bericat 2016 ) and research on embeddedness and social ties ( Granovetter 1985 ; Burt 2004 ) to more effectively capture a third mechanism that helps to produce successful science communication: these

Open access
Leslie A. Duram

Research indicates that several problems hinder climate change education, including complexity of scale, strict disciplinary divisions, lack of professional training, curriculum constraints, and controversy ( Robinson 2011 ; Sharma 2012 ; Shepardson et al. 2012 ). In addition, climate change topics are multidimensional and some science teachers say they lack confidence in teaching social, policy, or action components. Despite these challenges, research underscores the importance of climate

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Maria Carmen Lemos
,
Hallie Eakin
,
Lisa Dilling
, and
Jessica Worl

1. Introduction Few currently deny that extreme weather and climate change are among the most pressing problems of our times. For the past hundred years, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) has supported and fostered science focusing on meteorology and climatic change, but only more recently has this effort included the social sciences ( Demuth et al. 2007 ). In this chapter, we review some of the social science currently informing our understanding of human interactions with all forms of

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Barbara Millet
,
Andrew P. Carter
,
Kenneth Broad
,
Alberto Cairo
,
Scotney D. Evans
, and
Sharanya J. Majumdar

decision science perspective, through a broad array of social science perspectives and methods, from ethnographic studies to computer simulation experiments. A 2018 report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, for example, acknowledges the “growing recognition that a host of social and behavioral factors affect how we prepare for, observe, predict, respond to, and are impacted by weather hazards” ( National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine 2018 , p. 1). It

Free access
Sandy Smith-Nonini

inspired structural functionalism, which fell out of favor after heavy critique by social theorists. Another reason is the polyglot complexity literature that encompasses mathematics, physics, and computer modeling. Social scientists often seek to distinguish their fields from hard sciences—especially applied fields, and classical economics—which are often derided for embracing positivist, individualistic, and technologically determinist values. This paper will be mainly concerned with complexity

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Singular Extreme Events and Their Attribution to Climate Change: A Climate Service–Centered Analysis

Aglaé Jézéquel
,
Vivian Dépoues
,
Hélène Guillemot
,
Amélie Rajaud
,
Mélodie Trolliet
,
Mathieu Vrac
,
Jean-Paul Vanderlinden
, and
Pascal Yiou

scientific field whose creation and development have been legitimized through a social utility assumption. When Allen (2003) introduced the concept of event attribution, he stated a clear motivation: to provide the basis for science-based liability. Based on EEA results, individuals faced with attributable losses could sue polluters to compensate their losses. Allen and Lord (2004 ) develop this argument further, asking “who will pay for the damaging consequences of climate change?” following the

Open access
Joseph E. Trainor
,
Danielle Nagele
,
Brenda Philips
, and
Brittany Scott

) as part of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) Engineering Research Center. The data were collected by telephone interviews with an instrument that aimed to better understand public response to tornado and severe storm warnings by bringing together knowledge from social science disciplines that focus on weather warnings. The major topics the survey addresses include 1) receipt of warnings and alerts; 2) severe storm/tornado impacts

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A. K. Pavlov
,
A. Meyer
,
A. Rösel
,
L. Cohen
,
J. King
,
P. Itkin
,
J. Negrel
,
S. Gerland
,
S. R. Hudson
,
P. A. Dodd
,
L. de Steur
,
S. Mathisen
,
N. Cobbing
, and
M. A. Granskog

Emerging social media platforms provide great opportunities for research groups to effectively communicate Earth and climate sciences to the general public. “Science is not finished until it is communicated.” —Sir Mark Walport, former Government Chief Scientific Adviser in the United Kingdom Humankind faces several major challenges, of which climate change and its consequences are among the most perilous [ United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) 2015 ]. Options for

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