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Brian Joseph Squitieri
,
Andrew R. Wade
, and
Israel L. Jirak

. (2005) . Clearly, there are major meteorological differences between squall-line cases and MCSs resulting in progressive derechos, so the convective event that produces a derecho remains debatable, especially since the detrimental societal impacts inflicted by progressive and serial derechos can be similar in magnitude, as acknowledged by Corfidi et al. (2016a) . Matters are complicated further by the fact that an infinite spectrum of linear storm modes between serial squall lines and progressive

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Jeffrey K. Lazo
,
Donald M. Waldman
,
Betty Hearn Morrow
, and
Jennifer A. Thacher

summary on Miami one-on-one cognitive interviews—Hurricane forecast valuation study. Societal Impacts Program, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 24 pp . Letson, D. , Sutter D. , and Lazo J. K. , 2007 : The economic value of hurricane forecasts: An overview and research needs. Nat. Hazards Rev. , 8 ( 3 ) 78 – 86 . 10.1061/(ASCE)1527-6988(2007)8:3(78) Lindell, M. K. , and Prater C. S. , 2007 : Critical behavioral assumptions in evacuation time estimate analysis for private

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Ekaterina Bogdanovich
,
Lars Guenther
,
Markus Reichstein
,
Dorothea Frank
,
Georg Ruhrmann
,
Alexander Brenning
,
Jasper M. C. Denissen
, and
René Orth

societal responses to hot temperatures. Recently, digital data are facilitating the assessment of the societal response to various types of events; for instance, online search frequencies or social media data can serve as proxies for socioeconomic impacts ( Maurer and Holbach 2016 ; Ripberger 2011 ; Scharkow and Vogelgesang 2011 ). This becomes more and more feasible since online news and information are becoming increasingly important; in 2017, 74% of internet users in Germany (16–74 yr) read news

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David W. Walker
,
Noemi Vergopolan
,
Louise Cavalcante
,
Kelly Helm Smith
,
Sehouevi Mawuton David Agoungbome
,
André Almagro
,
Tushar Apurv
,
Nirmal Mani Dahal
,
David Hoffmann
,
Vishal Singh
, and
Zhang Xiang

, we call on flash drought researchers to be mindful that as they work to define this phenomenon they should think beyond their particular research interests to the broader societal relevance. Given the impact of flash drought on various sectors of society, this is not just a technical physical science issue.” This study provides further evidence to encourage such caution. Edris et al. (2023) investigated flash drought in the United States, separating examples of “flash” drying that did not lead

Open access
Fuqing Zhang
,
Rebecca E. Morss
,
J. A. Sippel
,
T. K. Beckman
,
N. C. Clements
,
N. L. Hampshire
,
J. N. Harvey
,
J. M. Hernandez
,
Z. C. Morgan
,
R. M. Mosier
,
S. Wang
, and
S. D. Winkley

evacuees were trapped on roadways for close to a day, experiencing fuel, food, and water shortages; lack of access to facilities; and significant frustration. Had the storm hit the Houston–Galveston area directly, the consequences would likely have been formidable, especially given that so many people were trapped on roads. After witnessing Rita and its impacts, several meteorology students at Texas A&M University became interested in investigating Rita’s forecasts and societal impacts in greater depth

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Heather Lazrus
,
Betty H. Morrow
,
Rebecca E. Morss
, and
Jeffrey K. Lazo

1. Introduction How do people who may be at particular risk of hurricane impacts receive, understand, and respond to hurricane forecast and warning information? To explore this question, we conducted research in a hurricane-prone region focusing on populations that can be characterized as being particularly vulnerable related to hurricane response. Vulnerability is broadly understood in the field of hazards research as differential susceptibility to damage or harm from a hazard, such as a

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Roger A. Pielke Jr.
and
Mary W. Downton

sciences in order to improve understanding of the interface of climate and society. While recent research has focused on developing a better quantitative understanding of the societal impacts of extreme weather in the context of hurricanes and other phenomena (e.g., Kunkel et al. 1999 ; Pielke and Landsea 1998 ), an understanding of damaging floods remains elusive. 2. Conceptual framework This paper builds upon a long history of research into the causes of damaging floods, and specifically the work

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David Samuel Williams

increasing their societal impact through an emancipatory approach. To illustrate this potential, the concept of multilevel governance for climate change adaptation will be described before embedding autonomy within this governance concept and referring this to the theoretical foundations of participatory research. Four categories of participatory research (functionalistic, neoliberal, deliberative, and emancipatory) ( Alcántara et al. 2014 ) will then be presented, and previous applications of

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Stephen M. Strader
,
Alex M. Haberlie
, and
Alexandra G. Loitz

vulnerability in many different ways (e.g., Cutter 1996 ; Department of Homeland Security 2010 ; Morss et al. 2011 ; Paul 2011 ; IPCC 2012 ). To remain consistent with prior research that has investigated tornado threats and societal impacts (e.g., Brooks et al. 2003 ; Dixon et al. 2011 ; Coleman and Dixon 2014 ; Ashley and Strader 2016 ; Strader and Ashley 2018 ), this study utilizes the basic climatological definition of risk that equates to the probability of a tornado occurring in space

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Mayra I. Rodríguez González
,
Christian Kelly Scott
,
Tatiana Marquina
,
Demeke B. Mewa
,
Jorge García Polo
, and
Binbin Peng

1. Introduction Urbanization can bring important societal advancements, but rapid and unplanned expansion, especially in the developing world, can exacerbate poverty, social upheaval due to issues of displacement, water scarcity, and food insecurity ( World Economic Forum 2018 ). It is estimated that by 2050 approximately 66% of the world’s population will live in cities, and 95% of new urban dwellers will reside in developing countries ( United Nations Department of Economic and Social

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