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A. D. McGuire, J. E. Walsh, J. S. Kimball, J. S. Clein, S. E. Euskirchen, S. Drobot, U. C. Herzfeld, J. Maslanik, R. B. Lammers, M. A. Rawlins, C. J. Vorosmarty, T. S. Rupp, W. Wu, and M. Calef

( McGuire et al. 2006 ). To predict the role of high-latitude terrestrial ecosystems in the response of the Earth system to global change requires the integration of climate dynamics, ecosystem dynamics, and large-scale hydrology in high-latitude regions. The Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE) Project was designed to assess the ability of models to simulate water/energy and CO 2 exchange with the atmosphere, and freshwater delivery to the ocean for the Alaskan region in the 1980s and 1990s. The

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Joy Clein, A. David McGuire, Eugenie S. Euskirchen, and Monika Calef

al. 2006 ; Thompson et al. 2006 ). The Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE) was set up to evaluate uncertainties in regional hydrology and carbon estimates in Alaska and the adjacent Yukon Territory associated with 1) alternative driving datasets and 2) alternative simulation models. As part of the WALE, Kimball et al. ( Kimball et al. 2007 ) conducted a study of carbon balance in the WALE region that compared the simulations of remote sensing and process-based models during recent decades

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J. S. Kimball, K. C. McDonald, and M. Zhao

; McDonald et al. 2004 ) and summer greening ( Myneni et al. 1997a ), indicating a generally positive boreal-arctic NPP response. However, other studies indicate a more variable productivity response to regional warming and associated earlier and longer growing seasons depending on soil moisture and nutrient availability, vegetation type, and disturbance regime ( Barber et al. 2000 ; Kimball et al. 2000 ; Wilmking et al. 2004 ; Goetz et al. 2005 ). The Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE) was

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J. S. Kimball, M. Zhao, A. D. McGuire, F. A. Heinsch, J. Clein, M. Calef, W. M. Jolly, S. Kang, S. E. Euskirchen, K. C. McDonald, and S. W. Running

patterns and trends from the remote sensing record in the context of more comprehensive simulations of the terrestrial carbon cycle. The Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE) was initiated to investigate the role of northern terrestrial ecosystems in the larger Arctic system response to global change through model and satellite remote sensing analyses of regional carbon, water, and energy cycles (McGuire et al., see WALE Special Theme). The objectives of the current investigation are to assess

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FERDINAND J. WALE

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FERDINAND J. WALE

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FERDINAND J. WALE

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FERDINAND J. WALE

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FERDINAND J. WALE

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Ute C. Herzfeld, Sheldon Drobot, Wanli Wu, Charles Fowler, and James Maslanik

1. Introduction and objectives The goal of the Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE) is to investigate the role of high-latitude terrestrial ecosystems in the response of the Arctic system to global change. To further this goal, climate datasets and climate model results are compiled, collected, and compared for the WALE study region, which includes land areas in Alaska and northwestern Canada at 55°–70°N, 165°–110°W approximately [see McGuire et al. 2006, manuscript submitted to Earth

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