Principles and Prescriptions for Improved Experimentation in Precipitation Augmentation Research

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  • 1 CIRES, University of Colorado, and NOAA/ERL, Environmental Sciences Group, Boulder, Colorado
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Abstract

Proper field experimentation in precipitation augmentation, or virtually any other topic, is not an easy task. Some general research considerations, i.e., the objectives of research, the quest for believability, and the two principal types of field studies, are discussed. The anatomy and stages of life of an experiment are presented, and the three levels or classes of an experiment (i.e., preliminary, exploratory, and confirmatory) are depicted. A number of prescriptions for improved experimentation are offered in regard to conceptual models, treatment design, treatment selection and allocation, treatment effect models, and analyses for treatment effects. Lastly, a few comments are appended on the role of statisticians in quality field research efforts.

When the well's dry, we know the worth of water. Ben Franklin, 1758 Poor Richard's Almanack

Abstract

Proper field experimentation in precipitation augmentation, or virtually any other topic, is not an easy task. Some general research considerations, i.e., the objectives of research, the quest for believability, and the two principal types of field studies, are discussed. The anatomy and stages of life of an experiment are presented, and the three levels or classes of an experiment (i.e., preliminary, exploratory, and confirmatory) are depicted. A number of prescriptions for improved experimentation are offered in regard to conceptual models, treatment design, treatment selection and allocation, treatment effect models, and analyses for treatment effects. Lastly, a few comments are appended on the role of statisticians in quality field research efforts.

When the well's dry, we know the worth of water. Ben Franklin, 1758 Poor Richard's Almanack

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