An Investigation of Mountain Waves with Lidar Observations

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  • a Stanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, Calif. 94025
  • b Langley Research Center, Ilampton, Va. 23365
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Abstract

In March and April of 1969 and 1970, lidar (laser radar) observations of the atmospheric structure were made in the lee of the Sierra Nevada during the occurrence of mountain lee waves. Rawinsonde ascents and, on some occasions, research aircraft flights supported the lidar observations. The objective of the program was to explore the applicability of the lidar technique to atmospheric turbulence detection. The observations demonstrate that a ground-based lidar can delineate significant features of the atmospheric flow pattern by monitoring echoes from concentrations of particulate matter that characterize the airflow structure in the form of either visible or subvisible clouds and dust.

Abstract

In March and April of 1969 and 1970, lidar (laser radar) observations of the atmospheric structure were made in the lee of the Sierra Nevada during the occurrence of mountain lee waves. Rawinsonde ascents and, on some occasions, research aircraft flights supported the lidar observations. The objective of the program was to explore the applicability of the lidar technique to atmospheric turbulence detection. The observations demonstrate that a ground-based lidar can delineate significant features of the atmospheric flow pattern by monitoring echoes from concentrations of particulate matter that characterize the airflow structure in the form of either visible or subvisible clouds and dust.

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