On the Variability of “Dynamic Seedability” as a Function of Time and Location over South Florida: Part I. Spatial Variability

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  • 1 Experimental Meteorology Laboratory, NOAA, Coral Gables, Fla.
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Abstract

Using the one-dimensional cumulus model developed by Cotton, predictions of the effects of seeding cumulus clouds were performed during the month of July 1973 as a part of the Experimental Meteorology Laboratory FACE 1973 Experiment. The calculations were performed with the Miami 1200 GMT soundings and soundings taken in the interior of Florida at 1400 GMT at the so-called Central Site (CS) location.A comparison of “seedability” predictions using the Miami 1200 GMT and CS 1400 GMT soundings have shown that substantial differences between the two seedability predictions occur on a number of days in spite of the fact that the soundings are separated in time by only 2 h and in space by only 110 km. The differences can be attributed to the frequent intrusion of dry air masses of varying height and thickness. The intensity of the dry layers is generally greatest over the higher-latitude CS location. The greatest differences between the two soundings, and hence the greatest difference between the predicted seeding effects, occurs during periods of transition from a disturbed, westerly flow regime to a well-defined, deep, easterly flow regime.

Abstract

Using the one-dimensional cumulus model developed by Cotton, predictions of the effects of seeding cumulus clouds were performed during the month of July 1973 as a part of the Experimental Meteorology Laboratory FACE 1973 Experiment. The calculations were performed with the Miami 1200 GMT soundings and soundings taken in the interior of Florida at 1400 GMT at the so-called Central Site (CS) location.A comparison of “seedability” predictions using the Miami 1200 GMT and CS 1400 GMT soundings have shown that substantial differences between the two seedability predictions occur on a number of days in spite of the fact that the soundings are separated in time by only 2 h and in space by only 110 km. The differences can be attributed to the frequent intrusion of dry air masses of varying height and thickness. The intensity of the dry layers is generally greatest over the higher-latitude CS location. The greatest differences between the two soundings, and hence the greatest difference between the predicted seeding effects, occurs during periods of transition from a disturbed, westerly flow regime to a well-defined, deep, easterly flow regime.

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