On the Variability of “Dynamic Seedability” as a Function of Time and Location over South Florida. Part II. Temporal Variability

View More View Less
  • 1 National Hurricane and Experimental Meteorology Laboratory, NOAA, Coral Gables, Fla.
© Get Permissions
Full access

Abstract

Using the one-dimensional cumulus model developed by Cotton, predictions of the effects of seeding cumulus clouds were performed during the month of July 1973 as part of the Experimental Meteorology Laboratory's Florida Area Cumulus Experiment 1973 experiment. In Part I we compared seedability predictions with the Miami 1200 GMT soundings and soundings taken over the center of the experimental area (Central Site) at 1400 GMT. It was found that substantial differences between the two predictions occurred on a number of days in spite of the fact that the soundings are separated in time by only 2 h and in space by only 110 km.

In this paper we compare seedability predictions with the MIA 1200 GMT soundings and the CS 1800 GMT soundings. The CS 1800 GMT soundings were assumed to be representative of conditions over the experimental area during the period of operation of the experiment. We found that the predictions with the MIA 1200 GMT soundings were, on the average, more representative of conditions over the center of the experimental area during the period of operation of the experiment than were the predictions with the CS 1400 GMT soundings. The results of this study indicate that the choice of a sounding site and sounding time to be used for prediction of seeding effects over an experimental area must be carefully considered in the design of the experiment.

Abstract

Using the one-dimensional cumulus model developed by Cotton, predictions of the effects of seeding cumulus clouds were performed during the month of July 1973 as part of the Experimental Meteorology Laboratory's Florida Area Cumulus Experiment 1973 experiment. In Part I we compared seedability predictions with the Miami 1200 GMT soundings and soundings taken over the center of the experimental area (Central Site) at 1400 GMT. It was found that substantial differences between the two predictions occurred on a number of days in spite of the fact that the soundings are separated in time by only 2 h and in space by only 110 km.

In this paper we compare seedability predictions with the MIA 1200 GMT soundings and the CS 1800 GMT soundings. The CS 1800 GMT soundings were assumed to be representative of conditions over the experimental area during the period of operation of the experiment. We found that the predictions with the MIA 1200 GMT soundings were, on the average, more representative of conditions over the center of the experimental area during the period of operation of the experiment than were the predictions with the CS 1400 GMT soundings. The results of this study indicate that the choice of a sounding site and sounding time to be used for prediction of seeding effects over an experimental area must be carefully considered in the design of the experiment.

Save