Results of a Comprehensive Atmospheric Aerosol-Radiation Experiment in the Southwestern United States. Part II: Radiation Flux Measurements and Theoretical Interpretation

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  • a National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo. 80303
  • | b Departments of Civil Engineering, Water and Air Resources, University of Washington, Seattle 98195
  • | c Mauna Loa Observatory, NOAA ARL, Hilo, Hawaii 96720
  • | d Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721
  • | e Department of Meteorology, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706
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Abstract

The experimental results in Part I are used in the theoretical interpretation of the radiation flux measurements which were taken with an aircraft. The absorption term of the complex refractive index of aerosols is estimated to be approximately 0.01 for a real part of 1.5 for the wavelength bandwidth 0.32–0.68 μm. A regional variation in the refractive index is noted.

Atmospheric heating and cooling rates due to aerosol and molecular absorption in the solar and terrestrial wavelengths are determined from the radiation flux measurements. The magnitudes of these rates are compared and their relative importance is discussed.

Abstract

The experimental results in Part I are used in the theoretical interpretation of the radiation flux measurements which were taken with an aircraft. The absorption term of the complex refractive index of aerosols is estimated to be approximately 0.01 for a real part of 1.5 for the wavelength bandwidth 0.32–0.68 μm. A regional variation in the refractive index is noted.

Atmospheric heating and cooling rates due to aerosol and molecular absorption in the solar and terrestrial wavelengths are determined from the radiation flux measurements. The magnitudes of these rates are compared and their relative importance is discussed.

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