All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 58 24 7
PDF Downloads 26 11 0

Three-Dimensional Distribution of Air Pollutants in the Los Angeles Basin

Rudolf B. HusarWashington University, St. Louis, Ma. 63130

Search for other papers by Rudolf B. Husar in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
David E. PattersonWashington University, St. Louis, Ma. 63130

Search for other papers by David E. Patterson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Donald L. BlumenthalMeteorology Research, Inc., Altadena, Calif. 91001

Search for other papers by Donald L. Blumenthal in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Warren H. WhiteMeteorology Research, Inc., Altadena, Calif. 91001

Search for other papers by Warren H. White in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Theodore B. SmithMeteorology Research, Inc., Altadena, Calif. 91001

Search for other papers by Theodore B. Smith in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Abstract

Data from a three-dimensional pollutant mapping program, conducted in the Los Angeles basin, wereanalyzed to obtain "grand average" vertical profiles sampled on 24 summer days in 1973. Morning andafternoon profiles at four locations show an erosion of the nighttime radiation inversion, increased temperatures, more intense mixing in the inland areas, and a semi-permanent subsidence inversion at higher levels.High values of primary pollutant parameters (NO, and condensation nuclei) are seen in the western part ofthe basin at Hawthorne. Secondary pollutant parameters (Os and light scattering coefficient) were dominating at the inland receptor site, Riverside. Ozone concentrations in the morning were consistently higheraloft. The deficit near the surface is attributed to ozone scavenging by primary emissions.

Abstract

Data from a three-dimensional pollutant mapping program, conducted in the Los Angeles basin, wereanalyzed to obtain "grand average" vertical profiles sampled on 24 summer days in 1973. Morning andafternoon profiles at four locations show an erosion of the nighttime radiation inversion, increased temperatures, more intense mixing in the inland areas, and a semi-permanent subsidence inversion at higher levels.High values of primary pollutant parameters (NO, and condensation nuclei) are seen in the western part ofthe basin at Hawthorne. Secondary pollutant parameters (Os and light scattering coefficient) were dominating at the inland receptor site, Riverside. Ozone concentrations in the morning were consistently higheraloft. The deficit near the surface is attributed to ozone scavenging by primary emissions.

Save