All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 189 43 10
PDF Downloads 74 31 8

Lidar Observations of the Convective Boundary Layer

K. E. KunkelDepartment of Meteorology, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706

Search for other papers by K. E. Kunkel in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
E. W. ElorantaDepartment of Meteorology, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706

Search for other papers by E. W. Eloranta in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
S. T. ShipleyDepartment of Meteorology, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53706

Search for other papers by S. T. Shipley in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Abstract

A scanning lidar system has been used to observe convection in the atmospheric boundary layer. In particular, cell sizes and geometry have been determined and circulation patterns in and around the cells have been measured.

The lidar data show that the preferred form of convective cells are plumes with roots near the surface. The majority of these plumes have aspects ratios between 0.5 and 1.5. The measurements of circulation patterns show the strongest rising motion on the upwind side of the cell with sinking motion on the downwind side. These observations show that lidar is a powerful tool for observing convection.

Abstract

A scanning lidar system has been used to observe convection in the atmospheric boundary layer. In particular, cell sizes and geometry have been determined and circulation patterns in and around the cells have been measured.

The lidar data show that the preferred form of convective cells are plumes with roots near the surface. The majority of these plumes have aspects ratios between 0.5 and 1.5. The measurements of circulation patterns show the strongest rising motion on the upwind side of the cell with sinking motion on the downwind side. These observations show that lidar is a powerful tool for observing convection.

Save