Sea Salt in Coastal Air and its Deposition on Porcelain Insulators

M. R. Kulkarni Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, India

Search for other papers by M. R. Kulkarni in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
B. B. Adiga Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, India

Search for other papers by B. B. Adiga in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
R. K. Kapoor Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, India

Search for other papers by R. K. Kapoor in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
V. V. Shirvaikar Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, India

Search for other papers by V. V. Shirvaikar in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Abstract

Measurements of concentration of salt in the air and its deposition on electrical insulators were made at Tarapur, a site on the west coast of India about 100 km north of Bombay. The aerosol coming from the sea during monsoon months was found to contain 74% NaCl. The salt concentration was found to increase exponentially with wind speed. The coefficients of the exponential fit are compared with measurements made elsewhere. Mass deposition velocity of the atmospheric salt on the inner corrugated surface of insulators which are not exposed to precipitation was also found to increase exponentially with wind speed.

Abstract

Measurements of concentration of salt in the air and its deposition on electrical insulators were made at Tarapur, a site on the west coast of India about 100 km north of Bombay. The aerosol coming from the sea during monsoon months was found to contain 74% NaCl. The salt concentration was found to increase exponentially with wind speed. The coefficients of the exponential fit are compared with measurements made elsewhere. Mass deposition velocity of the atmospheric salt on the inner corrugated surface of insulators which are not exposed to precipitation was also found to increase exponentially with wind speed.

Save