Mapping Frost-Sensitive Areas with a Three-Dimensional Local-Scale Numerical Model. Pad II: Comparison with Observations

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  • a Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado
  • | b Seagram Center for Soil and Water Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot 76100, Israel
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Abstract

A three-dimensional numerical model was developed to predict the microclimate near the ground surface of local-scale domains during radiative frost events. Its performances are compared with an observational topo-climatological survey of minimum temperatures at a height of 0.5 m above the soil surface which was carried out, during radiative float events, in the Hefer Valley, Israel. Considering only topography and soil type in the numerical simulation, relatively good agreement is obtained between predicted and observed minimum temperature. A more realistic picture is given when vegetation is incorporated in the model although larger discrepancies with observations are obtained. This is mainly explained by the fact that measurements were always carried out above bare surfaces, even when dense vegetation was present and, therefore do not provide a representative minimum temperature of many areas. This assumption is validated by field measurements of nighttime temperatures in an orchard and above a bare soil in its immediate vicinity.

Abstract

A three-dimensional numerical model was developed to predict the microclimate near the ground surface of local-scale domains during radiative frost events. Its performances are compared with an observational topo-climatological survey of minimum temperatures at a height of 0.5 m above the soil surface which was carried out, during radiative float events, in the Hefer Valley, Israel. Considering only topography and soil type in the numerical simulation, relatively good agreement is obtained between predicted and observed minimum temperature. A more realistic picture is given when vegetation is incorporated in the model although larger discrepancies with observations are obtained. This is mainly explained by the fact that measurements were always carried out above bare surfaces, even when dense vegetation was present and, therefore do not provide a representative minimum temperature of many areas. This assumption is validated by field measurements of nighttime temperatures in an orchard and above a bare soil in its immediate vicinity.

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