On the Mathematical Modeling of Pollen Dispersal and Deposition

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  • 1 Department of Geography, The University of Hull, Hull, England
  • | 2 The Center for Industrial Applied Mathematics, The University of Hull, Hull, England
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Abstract

A common method of predicting pollen concentration in a turbulent atmosphere involves solving a partial differential equation that governs the simultaneous convection and diffusion of airborne particles. This equation is subject to boundary conditions that include a mathematical description of the settling out process. This paper concentrates on the form of the lower boundary condition. We discuss (with reference to the structure of well known Gaussian solutions) the limitations of using a constant deposition velocity and show that errors induced when studying dispersal in an open environment are significantly reduced when applied to problems of transport through forests or plant canopies.

Abstract

A common method of predicting pollen concentration in a turbulent atmosphere involves solving a partial differential equation that governs the simultaneous convection and diffusion of airborne particles. This equation is subject to boundary conditions that include a mathematical description of the settling out process. This paper concentrates on the form of the lower boundary condition. We discuss (with reference to the structure of well known Gaussian solutions) the limitations of using a constant deposition velocity and show that errors induced when studying dispersal in an open environment are significantly reduced when applied to problems of transport through forests or plant canopies.

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