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Marking 60 Years of Applied Meteorology and Climate Publishing

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© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

© 2021 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).

Since 1962, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) has had a journal dedicated to utilizing meteorological and climatological information to help solve some of society’s greatest challenges. This editorial is to celebrate a noteworthy anniversary of the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology (JAMC).

Sixty years ago, the Journal of Applied Meteorology was launched by AMS, providing an avenue for publishing scientific research “with the application of the atmospheric sciences to operational and practical goals” Hilst (1969). Since its inception, this journal has had slightly varying names, signifying expansion of the scientific community and the shifting needs of the wider society for weather and climate knowledge. In 1982, climate was recognized as an important separate topic with the publication of the Journal of Climate and Applied Meteorology. The first issue under this new name included a special section on drought, in association with an American Association for the Advancement of Science symposium (Hecht and Bergman 1983). A new journal reflecting the rapid growth in climate research, the Journal of Climate, was launched by AMS in 1988. So, the Journal of Climate and Applied Meteorology returned to its roots as the Journal of Applied Meteorology (Silverman 1988), handling such topics as physical meteorology, remote sensing, boundary layer meteorology, and the application of numerical models (Hanna 1988). Eighteen years later, Rauber et al. (2006) announced initiation of the current iteration, the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology. This followed Changnon’s (2005) description of the “golden age of applied climatology,” citing the rapidly growing field of relating varying climate conditions to numerous natural systems and societal applications.

Over the decades, JAMC has maintained a critical presence in the atmospheric sciences through a thorough peer-review process developed by AMS to ensure the highest standards in publishing quality research. The long-standing reputation of JAMC in the field is reflected by the long-term relevance of its articles; Clarivate estimates that since 2018, the median age of cited JAMC articles has been about 14 years (Clarivate Journal Citation Reports; data not publicly available). For the decade before 2018, the “half life” of cited JAMC articles was reported as more than 10 years. For the 2020 release year, JAMC articles have been cited more than 15 000 times by articles in scientific journals (Clarivate Journal Citation Reports; data not publicly available).

The wide-ranging impacts of weather and climate on most aspects of life is reflected in the particularly wide scope of papers published in JAMC. We have noted increases in submissions in “hot topics” in the scientific community, such as numerical and statistical model downscaling, urban climate, glaciogenic cloud seeding, fog, and damaging-hurricane conditions. [The full scope of topics published in this journal can be found online (https://journals.ametsoc.org/view/journals/apme/apme-overview.xml).] The focus of JAMC articles is worldwide, with studies of weather and climate in nearly every continent and ocean. In the last few months, research has been published on climate conditions in more than 18 countries, including the United States, China, Brazil, Uganda, the United Arab Emirates, and Finland.

Focusing on applications of meteorology and climatology serves as a great scientific opportunity and publishing challenge. I have been honored to work for the past 20 years with exceptional chief editors, editors, and associate editors of this journal; commissioners of the AMS Publications Commission; AMS Publications Department leaders and staff, including peer-review support staff; and the AMS reporting and analytics manager. The journal will continue to serve the growing field of applied meteorology and climate as we build toward the 100-yr anniversary!

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