A Pilot Experiment Using Indium as Tracer in a Convective Storm

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  • 1 Dept. of Meteorology and Oceanography, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
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Abstract

In an effort to determine whether it is feasible to use tracer techniques in the study of circulations and rain scavenging processes in severe convective storms, a pilot experiment using indium as tracer was conducted. A total of 200 gm of indium was released over a period of 21 min into the updraft feeding a relatively small convective system. The tracer was released by means of pyrotechnic flares from an airplane flying at about 3200 ft altitude. The rainfall from the system was sampled at the ground by means of an array of samplers placed and recovered by two mobile units. Analysis of the samples compared against analyses of untagged rain samples and reagent backgrounds of indium distinctly indicates the presence of tracer indium in a reasonable distribution pattern.

Abstract

In an effort to determine whether it is feasible to use tracer techniques in the study of circulations and rain scavenging processes in severe convective storms, a pilot experiment using indium as tracer was conducted. A total of 200 gm of indium was released over a period of 21 min into the updraft feeding a relatively small convective system. The tracer was released by means of pyrotechnic flares from an airplane flying at about 3200 ft altitude. The rainfall from the system was sampled at the ground by means of an array of samplers placed and recovered by two mobile units. Analysis of the samples compared against analyses of untagged rain samples and reagent backgrounds of indium distinctly indicates the presence of tracer indium in a reasonable distribution pattern.

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