All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 198 69 2
PDF Downloads 62 38 3

Using Topex/Poseidon Data to Enhance ERS-1 Data

View More View Less
  • 1 CLS Space, Oceanography Group, Toulouse, France
Full access

Abstract

This paper presents a relatively straightforward method for efficiently reducing the ERS-1 orbit error using Topex/Postidon data. The method is based on a global minimization of Topex/Poscidon-ERS-1 (TP-E) dual crossover differences. The TP-E crossover differences give an estimate of the ERS-1 radial orbit error almost directly, leading to a geometric estimation of orbit error. Smoothing cubic-spline functions are then used to obtain a continuous estimation of the orbit error over time. The splines can also be adjusted to minimize the ERS-1-ERS-1 (E-E) crossover differences. This allows a better estimation of the orbit error, especially poleward of 66° where no TP-E crossovers are available. The method was successfully applied to the final TP and ERS-1 datasets [i.e., the TP GDRs (geophysical data records) and the ERS-1 OPRs (ocean products)]. The authors used one full 35-day ERS-1 cycle and five TP cycles concurrent with ERS-1 data. Only crossovers with time differences lm than 5 days are used in the adjustment so that most of the large-scale oceanic signal is preserved. Just by using dual TP-E crossovers, E-E crossover differences are reduced from 18 to 10 cm. Also using the single E-E crossovers in the adjustment significantly improves the solution poleward of 66°. The E-E crossover differences are thus globally reduced to only 8 cm. The method was also shown to be almost insensitive to the initial ERS-1 orbit error. The results demonstrate that the orbit of ERS-1 can be determined with an accuracy similar to TP. The method also provides a precise, homogeneous ERS-1-TP dataset. This dataset can be used to map sea level variation or mean sea surface with high accuracy and excellent resolution. More generally, this study shows that when two satellites are flying simultaneously, the more precise one can be used as a reference. This is of great importance for future altimetric missions.

Abstract

This paper presents a relatively straightforward method for efficiently reducing the ERS-1 orbit error using Topex/Postidon data. The method is based on a global minimization of Topex/Poscidon-ERS-1 (TP-E) dual crossover differences. The TP-E crossover differences give an estimate of the ERS-1 radial orbit error almost directly, leading to a geometric estimation of orbit error. Smoothing cubic-spline functions are then used to obtain a continuous estimation of the orbit error over time. The splines can also be adjusted to minimize the ERS-1-ERS-1 (E-E) crossover differences. This allows a better estimation of the orbit error, especially poleward of 66° where no TP-E crossovers are available. The method was successfully applied to the final TP and ERS-1 datasets [i.e., the TP GDRs (geophysical data records) and the ERS-1 OPRs (ocean products)]. The authors used one full 35-day ERS-1 cycle and five TP cycles concurrent with ERS-1 data. Only crossovers with time differences lm than 5 days are used in the adjustment so that most of the large-scale oceanic signal is preserved. Just by using dual TP-E crossovers, E-E crossover differences are reduced from 18 to 10 cm. Also using the single E-E crossovers in the adjustment significantly improves the solution poleward of 66°. The E-E crossover differences are thus globally reduced to only 8 cm. The method was also shown to be almost insensitive to the initial ERS-1 orbit error. The results demonstrate that the orbit of ERS-1 can be determined with an accuracy similar to TP. The method also provides a precise, homogeneous ERS-1-TP dataset. This dataset can be used to map sea level variation or mean sea surface with high accuracy and excellent resolution. More generally, this study shows that when two satellites are flying simultaneously, the more precise one can be used as a reference. This is of great importance for future altimetric missions.

Save