CORRIGENDUM

Benjamin D. Reineman Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California

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Luc Lenain Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California

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Nicholas M. Statom Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California

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W. Kendall Melville Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California

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In the final processing of Reineman et al. (2013), the appearance of Fig. 17 on p. 1313 was inadvertently altered. Figure 17 appears below as it was meant to be shown.

Fig. 17.
Fig. 17.

Sample time series of variables measured by the ScanEagle Flux payload, at an altitude of 32.4 ± 3.1 m AGL over the Potomac River on 13 Apr 2012, showing (a) vertical wind; (b) water vapor concentration, as measured by the krypton hygrometer; and (c) temperature, as measured by the optical sensor (low-pass filtered with a 4-Hz-cutoff Butterworth filter). Positive correlation between vapor concentration and vertical wind can be seen (most notably in the times outlined in gray rectangles), implying positive vertical transport of water vapor and therefore positive latent heat. (d) Scatterplot of turbulent water vapor against turbulent vertical wind. Turbulent vapor flux can be calculated with the mean of the products of these quantities; shown is that calculated from the 90-s segment shown in (a)–(c). Plus and minus symbols show the sign of contribution to the flux within each quadrant. Water vapor flux is also quantified using integrated cospectra in Fig. 18b (see section 4c). Correlation between temperature and vertical wind is less pronounced, corresponding to the small and variable fluxes seen in Fig. 18c.

Citation: Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 30, 12; 10.1175/JTECH-D-13-00212.1

The staff of the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology regrets any inconvenience this error may have caused.

REFERENCE

Reineman, B. D., Lenain L. , Statom N. M. , and Melville W. K. , 2013: Development and testing of instrumentation for UAV-based flux measurements within terrestrial and marine atmospheric boundary layers. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 30, 12951319.

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  • Reineman, B. D., Lenain L. , Statom N. M. , and Melville W. K. , 2013: Development and testing of instrumentation for UAV-based flux measurements within terrestrial and marine atmospheric boundary layers. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 30, 12951319.

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  • Fig. 17.

    Sample time series of variables measured by the ScanEagle Flux payload, at an altitude of 32.4 ± 3.1 m AGL over the Potomac River on 13 Apr 2012, showing (a) vertical wind; (b) water vapor concentration, as measured by the krypton hygrometer; and (c) temperature, as measured by the optical sensor (low-pass filtered with a 4-Hz-cutoff Butterworth filter). Positive correlation between vapor concentration and vertical wind can be seen (most notably in the times outlined in gray rectangles), implying positive vertical transport of water vapor and therefore positive latent heat. (d) Scatterplot of turbulent water vapor against turbulent vertical wind. Turbulent vapor flux can be calculated with the mean of the products of these quantities; shown is that calculated from the 90-s segment shown in (a)–(c). Plus and minus symbols show the sign of contribution to the flux within each quadrant. Water vapor flux is also quantified using integrated cospectra in Fig. 18b (see section 4c). Correlation between temperature and vertical wind is less pronounced, corresponding to the small and variable fluxes seen in Fig. 18c.

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