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A Spherical Temperature Sensor Array Design for Near-Surface Atmospheric Temperature Studies

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  • 1 Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Meteorological Observation and Information Processing, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, and Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center on Atmospheric Environment and Equipment Technology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, China
  • 2 Jiangsu Meteorological Observation Center, Nanjing, China
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Abstract

The observation accuracy of the surface air temperature less than 0.1 K is a requirement, stated by the meteorological and climatological community. However, the accuracy of a temperature sensor inside a shield is affected by a number of factors including solar radiation, wind speed, upwelling longwave radiation, air density, sun elevation angle, sun azimuth angle, underlying surface, precipitation, moisture, structure, and coating of the radiation shield. Due to these factors, the temperature error of the temperature sensor may be much larger than 1 K under adverse conditions. To improve the observation accuracy, this paper proposed a spherical temperature sensor array. A series of analytical calculations based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is performed to verify the design principle of this sensor array. The calculation results show that the temperature error ratio can be assumed as a constant. To verify the accuracy of this sensor array, simulations and observation experiments are conducted. The simulation results show that the mean difference between the temperature provided by this sensor array and the reference air temperature is 0.072 K. The field experiment results show that a root-mean-square error (RMSE) and a mean absolute error (MAE) between the temperature provided by this sensor array and the reference air temperature are 0.173 and 0.153 K, respectively.

Corresponding author: Qingquan Liu, 001980@nuist.edu.cn

Abstract

The observation accuracy of the surface air temperature less than 0.1 K is a requirement, stated by the meteorological and climatological community. However, the accuracy of a temperature sensor inside a shield is affected by a number of factors including solar radiation, wind speed, upwelling longwave radiation, air density, sun elevation angle, sun azimuth angle, underlying surface, precipitation, moisture, structure, and coating of the radiation shield. Due to these factors, the temperature error of the temperature sensor may be much larger than 1 K under adverse conditions. To improve the observation accuracy, this paper proposed a spherical temperature sensor array. A series of analytical calculations based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is performed to verify the design principle of this sensor array. The calculation results show that the temperature error ratio can be assumed as a constant. To verify the accuracy of this sensor array, simulations and observation experiments are conducted. The simulation results show that the mean difference between the temperature provided by this sensor array and the reference air temperature is 0.072 K. The field experiment results show that a root-mean-square error (RMSE) and a mean absolute error (MAE) between the temperature provided by this sensor array and the reference air temperature are 0.173 and 0.153 K, respectively.

Corresponding author: Qingquan Liu, 001980@nuist.edu.cn
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