In Situ Underwater Average Flow Velocity Estimation Using a Low-cost Video Velocimeter

View More View Less
  • 1 Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
  • | 2 Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA 95039, USA
© Get Permissions
Open access

Abstract

The development of a low-cost Video Velocimeter (VIV) to estimate underwater bulk flow velocity is described. The instrument utilizes a simplified particle image correlation technique to reconstruct an average flow velocity vector from video recordings of ambient particles. The VIV uses a single camera with a set of mirrors that splits the view into two stereoscopic views, allowing estimation of the flow velocity vector. The VIV was validated in a controlled flume using ambient seawater, and subsequently field tested together with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter with both mounted close to the coastal seafloor. When used in non-turbulent flow, the instrument can estimate mean flow velocity parallel to the front face of the instrument with root-mean-squared errors of the main flow within 10% of the ±20 cm/s measurement range when compared to an ADV. The predominant feature of the VIV is that it is a cost-effective method to estimate flow velocity in complex benthic habitats where velocity parallel to the sea floor is of interest.

Denotes content that is immediately available upon publication as open access.

plertvil@ucsd.edu

Abstract

The development of a low-cost Video Velocimeter (VIV) to estimate underwater bulk flow velocity is described. The instrument utilizes a simplified particle image correlation technique to reconstruct an average flow velocity vector from video recordings of ambient particles. The VIV uses a single camera with a set of mirrors that splits the view into two stereoscopic views, allowing estimation of the flow velocity vector. The VIV was validated in a controlled flume using ambient seawater, and subsequently field tested together with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter with both mounted close to the coastal seafloor. When used in non-turbulent flow, the instrument can estimate mean flow velocity parallel to the front face of the instrument with root-mean-squared errors of the main flow within 10% of the ±20 cm/s measurement range when compared to an ADV. The predominant feature of the VIV is that it is a cost-effective method to estimate flow velocity in complex benthic habitats where velocity parallel to the sea floor is of interest.

Denotes content that is immediately available upon publication as open access.

plertvil@ucsd.edu
Save