Methods for Dispersal of Precipitated Calcium Carbonate for Stratospheric Aerosol Injection

View More View Less
  • 1 a Silver Lining, Sunnyvale CA
© Get Permissions
Restricted access

Abstract

Two methods for the laboratory-scale formation of aerosols of nanosized particles of precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), for potential use in Stratospheric Aerosol Injection (SAI), a Solar Radiation Management (SRM) technique, are described. The first uses the coarse fluidization of bulk PCC in a simple vessel, followed by dispersal using a commercially available two-fluid nozzle. The manufacturer’s measured particle mass distribution for the bulk material, and sprayed aerosol particle mass distributions are compared, indicating that the sprayed particles are well separated in spite of a notoriously problematic agglomeration tendency. The method is suitable for scale-up. A second dispersal method, useful for small laboratory experiments, using liquid carbon dioxide as a dispersant as well as spray propellant gave similar results. The mass mode diameters measured here (0.89 to 1.4 μm) differ from that stated by the manufacturer (0.7 μm), but the distributions are consistent in showing complete separation of the particles.

Corresponding author: Armand Neukermans, armandn@sbcglobal.net

Current Affiliation: PARC, Palo Alto CA.

Deceased.

Abstract

Two methods for the laboratory-scale formation of aerosols of nanosized particles of precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), for potential use in Stratospheric Aerosol Injection (SAI), a Solar Radiation Management (SRM) technique, are described. The first uses the coarse fluidization of bulk PCC in a simple vessel, followed by dispersal using a commercially available two-fluid nozzle. The manufacturer’s measured particle mass distribution for the bulk material, and sprayed aerosol particle mass distributions are compared, indicating that the sprayed particles are well separated in spite of a notoriously problematic agglomeration tendency. The method is suitable for scale-up. A second dispersal method, useful for small laboratory experiments, using liquid carbon dioxide as a dispersant as well as spray propellant gave similar results. The mass mode diameters measured here (0.89 to 1.4 μm) differ from that stated by the manufacturer (0.7 μm), but the distributions are consistent in showing complete separation of the particles.

Corresponding author: Armand Neukermans, armandn@sbcglobal.net

Current Affiliation: PARC, Palo Alto CA.

Deceased.

Save