A HIGH-ALTITUDE RADIOSONDE HYPSOMETER

View More View Less
  • 1 U. S. Army Signal Engineering Laboratories, Fort Monmouth, N. J.
© Get Permissions
Full access

Abstract

Efforts to improve the basic design of a high-altitude radiosonde hypsometer have resulted in a working model consisting of a small vacuum flask filled with cotton which has been saturated with carbon-disulfide, and in which is immersed a bent-stem bead thermistor. In laboratory tests this device proved capable of measuring pressures within one per cent in the range 300 to five mb and within two per cent in the range five to two mb. Flight tests using only an aneroid capsule as the pressure “standard” have shown that this model functions with an accuracy of two to five per cent in the pressure range 30 to two mb.

Abstract

Efforts to improve the basic design of a high-altitude radiosonde hypsometer have resulted in a working model consisting of a small vacuum flask filled with cotton which has been saturated with carbon-disulfide, and in which is immersed a bent-stem bead thermistor. In laboratory tests this device proved capable of measuring pressures within one per cent in the range 300 to five mb and within two per cent in the range five to two mb. Flight tests using only an aneroid capsule as the pressure “standard” have shown that this model functions with an accuracy of two to five per cent in the pressure range 30 to two mb.

Save