SORPTION BY THE EARTH SURFACE AND A NEW CLASSIFICATION OF KATA-HYDROMETEORIC PROCESSES

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  • 1 University of Washington
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Abstract

It is proposed to call all processes bringing water of any phase to the surface kata-hydrometeoric processes.Their classification includes, e.g., intercepted precipitation, dew and at least five forms of sorption. Specialemphasis is then given to some generally neglected sorptive processes. Sorptive water intake can be calculatedby using Hofmann's dew formulae if the relative humidity of the surface is supposed to be less than 100per cent. Soil, plants and water solutions have known sorptive qualities; the most important process inpractice is adsorption by dry clay. Field tests in India, Ohio, Nebraska and Texas show strong soil sorptionespecially on the late afternoons of sunny days. This sorption seems also responsible for fog prevention alongthe Gulf Coast on summer nights.

Abstract

It is proposed to call all processes bringing water of any phase to the surface kata-hydrometeoric processes.Their classification includes, e.g., intercepted precipitation, dew and at least five forms of sorption. Specialemphasis is then given to some generally neglected sorptive processes. Sorptive water intake can be calculatedby using Hofmann's dew formulae if the relative humidity of the surface is supposed to be less than 100per cent. Soil, plants and water solutions have known sorptive qualities; the most important process inpractice is adsorption by dry clay. Field tests in India, Ohio, Nebraska and Texas show strong soil sorptionespecially on the late afternoons of sunny days. This sorption seems also responsible for fog prevention alongthe Gulf Coast on summer nights.

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