ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURES AND SOLAR ACTIVITY—I. 100 MB IN THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE AURORAL ZONE

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  • 1 Air Force Cambridge Research Center
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Abstract

An attempt is made to determine whether there are systematic temperature changes in or near the Northern Hemisphere auroral zone at 100 mb due to anomalous solar corpuscular radiation. A number of tests is conducted yielding generally negative results. The one possible exception is a test indicating a temperature rise of approximately 1C following magnetic storms which were preceded by at least one week of relatively undisturbed (geomagnetically) conditions. The usual significance tests show the increase to be significant above the five-per-cent level. However, the results of other tests do not tend to confirm this result, and hence there is some doubt as to its reality. In any event, an upper limit of approximately 1C is indicated as the largest average systematic rise to be expected at 100 mb from solar corpuscular storms.

Abstract

An attempt is made to determine whether there are systematic temperature changes in or near the Northern Hemisphere auroral zone at 100 mb due to anomalous solar corpuscular radiation. A number of tests is conducted yielding generally negative results. The one possible exception is a test indicating a temperature rise of approximately 1C following magnetic storms which were preceded by at least one week of relatively undisturbed (geomagnetically) conditions. The usual significance tests show the increase to be significant above the five-per-cent level. However, the results of other tests do not tend to confirm this result, and hence there is some doubt as to its reality. In any event, an upper limit of approximately 1C is indicated as the largest average systematic rise to be expected at 100 mb from solar corpuscular storms.

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