All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 180 24 2
PDF Downloads 38 19 2

THE MOTION AND EROSION OF CONVECTIVE STORMS IN SEVERE VERTICAL WIND SHEAR

Walter HitschfeldMcGill University

Search for other papers by Walter Hitschfeld in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Abstract

Well developed thunderstorms were observed by CAPPI-equipped radar to remain upright even in the presence of severe wind shear. Instead of being strongly bent by the shear, parts of the storm appeared to be carried off by the wind, forming extensive plume patterns, which trailed down toward the ground while evaporating. An analysis of the horizontal and vertical development of the plume suggested that its particles had fall speeds ranging from 0.75 to 5 m sec−1 and were thus of precipitation size.

The motion of the entire storm system is related to the wind at low levels but only in a general way. Instances where the echo motion differs substantially from the observed winds at all heights are quite common. Vertical motion and storm erosion are used to explain how active cores of large storms remain nearly vertical, almost independently of the wind shear.

Abstract

Well developed thunderstorms were observed by CAPPI-equipped radar to remain upright even in the presence of severe wind shear. Instead of being strongly bent by the shear, parts of the storm appeared to be carried off by the wind, forming extensive plume patterns, which trailed down toward the ground while evaporating. An analysis of the horizontal and vertical development of the plume suggested that its particles had fall speeds ranging from 0.75 to 5 m sec−1 and were thus of precipitation size.

The motion of the entire storm system is related to the wind at low levels but only in a general way. Instances where the echo motion differs substantially from the observed winds at all heights are quite common. Vertical motion and storm erosion are used to explain how active cores of large storms remain nearly vertical, almost independently of the wind shear.

Save