A Model for Diffusion of Radioactive Debris in the Troposphere

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  • 1 university of Utah, Salt Lab City
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Abstract

A theoretical model is constructed and tested for the analysis and prediction of radioactive concentration in the troposphere. It is found that turbulent motion near the jet core plays the major role in the transport of radioactive debris from the stratosphere into the troposphere, whereas the mean motion of the jet core contributes to the spring maximum and autumn minimum of the concentration. A semiannual period in the variation of concentration exists, resulting from the interaction between the meridional gradient of the mean concentration and the mean motion of the jet core. It is also found that the average value of the vertical component of the eddy diffusivity in the troposphere is about 107 cm2 sec−1, and that the time required for diffusing radioactive particles from the tropopause level to the surface of the earth is about 11 hours.

Abstract

A theoretical model is constructed and tested for the analysis and prediction of radioactive concentration in the troposphere. It is found that turbulent motion near the jet core plays the major role in the transport of radioactive debris from the stratosphere into the troposphere, whereas the mean motion of the jet core contributes to the spring maximum and autumn minimum of the concentration. A semiannual period in the variation of concentration exists, resulting from the interaction between the meridional gradient of the mean concentration and the mean motion of the jet core. It is also found that the average value of the vertical component of the eddy diffusivity in the troposphere is about 107 cm2 sec−1, and that the time required for diffusing radioactive particles from the tropopause level to the surface of the earth is about 11 hours.

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