All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 135 14 0
PDF Downloads 33 8 0

Particles in the Antarctic Atmosphere

R. D. CadleNational Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.

Search for other papers by R. D. Cadle in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
W. H. FischerNational Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.

Search for other papers by W. H. Fischer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
E. R. FrankNational Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.

Search for other papers by E. R. Frank in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
J. P. Lodge Jr.National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.

Search for other papers by J. P. Lodge Jr. in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
Full access

Abstract

Samples of particles collected by impaction in the antarctic atmosphere near the earth's surface during November and December 1966 contained much higher concentrations of sulfur than similar samples collected in most parts of the world. The sulfur was largely in the form of SO4, but some S2O8 may also have been present. The cations mere largely NH4+ and H+. Most samples contained little sodium chloride.

The concentrations in the air of collected particles varied from 0.1 to 1 cm−3.

Possible explanations for the high sulfur to chlorine ratio are suggested.

Abstract

Samples of particles collected by impaction in the antarctic atmosphere near the earth's surface during November and December 1966 contained much higher concentrations of sulfur than similar samples collected in most parts of the world. The sulfur was largely in the form of SO4, but some S2O8 may also have been present. The cations mere largely NH4+ and H+. Most samples contained little sodium chloride.

The concentrations in the air of collected particles varied from 0.1 to 1 cm−3.

Possible explanations for the high sulfur to chlorine ratio are suggested.

Save