All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 133 29 10
PDF Downloads 23 13 1

The Far Infrared Transmission of the Upper Atmosphere

View More View Less
  • 1 High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.
Full access

Abstract

Observations of solar and sky radiation in the far infrared (20–125 cm−1) spectral region from a jet aircraft at 12 km altitude are presented, and the presence of absorption lines in the spectra due to H2O, O2, O3 and (H2O)2 discussed. Estimates of the quantities of precipitable water present above the aircraft are deduced, based upon theoretically generated and instrumentally convolved spectra. An O3 quantity, based upon observed Q branch absorptions, is given.

The observations are employed to determine 1 cm−1 wide regions of low absorption in the 30–125 cm−1 spectral range. The fractional transmission of the atmosphere above 12 km altitude in these spectral regions is calculated, based upon recent quantitative laboratory work, considering absorption due to H2O lines, far wings of H2O lines, and collision-induced absorption by N2 and O2.

Abstract

Observations of solar and sky radiation in the far infrared (20–125 cm−1) spectral region from a jet aircraft at 12 km altitude are presented, and the presence of absorption lines in the spectra due to H2O, O2, O3 and (H2O)2 discussed. Estimates of the quantities of precipitable water present above the aircraft are deduced, based upon theoretically generated and instrumentally convolved spectra. An O3 quantity, based upon observed Q branch absorptions, is given.

The observations are employed to determine 1 cm−1 wide regions of low absorption in the 30–125 cm−1 spectral range. The fractional transmission of the atmosphere above 12 km altitude in these spectral regions is calculated, based upon recent quantitative laboratory work, considering absorption due to H2O lines, far wings of H2O lines, and collision-induced absorption by N2 and O2.

Save