Photochemistry of the Venus Atmosphere

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  • 1 Center for Earth and Planetary Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. 02138
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Abstract

Carbon monoxide, produced in the Venus atmosphere by photolysis of CO2, is removed mainly by reaction with OH. The radical OH is formed in part by photolysis of H2O2, in part by reaction of 0 with H02. Photolysis of HCl provides a major source of H radicals near the visible clouds of Venus and plays a major role in the overall photochemistry. The mixing ratio of 02 is estimated to be approximately 10−7, about a factor of 10 less than a recent observational upper limit reported by Traub and Carleton. A detailed model, which accounts for the photochemical stability of Venus CO2, is presented and discussed.

Abstract

Carbon monoxide, produced in the Venus atmosphere by photolysis of CO2, is removed mainly by reaction with OH. The radical OH is formed in part by photolysis of H2O2, in part by reaction of 0 with H02. Photolysis of HCl provides a major source of H radicals near the visible clouds of Venus and plays a major role in the overall photochemistry. The mixing ratio of 02 is estimated to be approximately 10−7, about a factor of 10 less than a recent observational upper limit reported by Traub and Carleton. A detailed model, which accounts for the photochemical stability of Venus CO2, is presented and discussed.

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