The Structure of the Two-Dimensional Internal Boundary Layer over a Sudden Change of Surface Roughness

View More View Less
  • 1 Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories, Bedford, Mass. 01730
© Get Permissions
Full access

Abstract

The effects of an abrupt change of surface roughness on the mean flow and turbulence structure in the neutral surface layer are numerically investigated by a higher-order turbulence closure theory, which includes dynamical equations for Reynolds stresses and the viscous dissipation rate. The closed system of governing equations, together with the specified initial and boundary conditions, is solved by an explicit finite-difference method on a digital computer.

The numerical model predicts the distributions of mean wind, shear stress, turbulent energy and other quantities, with no a priori assumptions regarding the distributions of any of these variables in the transition region. The distributions of the nondimensional wind shear, the dissipation and mixing length scales, and the ratio of stress to turbulent kinetic energy are shown to differ significantly from their equilibrium flow variations.

Abstract

The effects of an abrupt change of surface roughness on the mean flow and turbulence structure in the neutral surface layer are numerically investigated by a higher-order turbulence closure theory, which includes dynamical equations for Reynolds stresses and the viscous dissipation rate. The closed system of governing equations, together with the specified initial and boundary conditions, is solved by an explicit finite-difference method on a digital computer.

The numerical model predicts the distributions of mean wind, shear stress, turbulent energy and other quantities, with no a priori assumptions regarding the distributions of any of these variables in the transition region. The distributions of the nondimensional wind shear, the dissipation and mixing length scales, and the ratio of stress to turbulent kinetic energy are shown to differ significantly from their equilibrium flow variations.

Save